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Descendants of Peder Andersson



Generation No. 1

1.  PEDER4 ANDERSSON  (ANDERS3 HALVARDSON, HALVARD2 ANDERSSON, ANDERS1 HANSSON) was born 1768 in Tjernagel Søre Farm, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway, and died 1814.  He married HELGA CHRISTENSDATTER 11 Jul 1790 in Finnås Parish, Hordaland, Norway, daughter of KRISTEN NILSSON and HELGA ENDRESDATTER.  She was born 1763 in Sele (Sille), Bømlo, Hordaland, Norway.
   
Children of PEDER ANDERSSON and HELGA CHRISTENSDATTER are:
    i.    ANDERS5 PEDERSON, b. 1790; d. 1790.
2.    ii.    CHRISTEN PEDERSON, b. 08 Jan 1792, Tjernagel Søre Farm, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway; d. 11 Jul 1846, Tjernagel, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway.
    iii.    KRISTI PEDERSDATTER, b. 1794; d. 1794.
3.    iv.    KRISTI PEDERSDATTER, b. 1797, Lio (Lien) Farm, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway; d. 1888, Illinois.
4.    v.    HELGA PEDERSDATTER, b. Abt. 1803, Lio (Lien) Farm, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway; d. 29 May 1851, Tjernagel, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway.
    vi.    MARTA PEDERSDATTER, b. 1805.


Generation No. 2

2.  CHRISTEN5 PEDERSON (PEDER4 ANDERSSON, ANDERS3 HALVARDSON, HALVARD2 ANDERSSON, ANDERS1 HANSSON) was born 08 Jan 1792 in Tjernagel Søre Farm, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway, and died 11 Jul 1846 in Tjernagel, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway.  He married (1) BRITA JOKUMSDATTER 02 Jul 1819 in Tjernagel, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway, daughter of JOKUM JOKUMSEN and MALENE HANSDATTER.  She was born 1798 in Næsse (Nesse) Farm, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway, and died 1829.  He married (2) MARI ANDERSDATTER 10 Jul 1831 in Hordaland, Norway.  She was born 1810 in Tjernagel Nordre Farm, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway, and died 02 Sep 1897 in Howard Township, Story County, IA.

More About CHRISTEN PEDERSON:
Burial: 16 Jul 1846, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway

More About MARI ANDERSDATTER:
Burial: Mamrelund Cemetery, Scott Twp, Hamilton County, IA
Census: 1860, Story City, Norway Twp, Hamilton County, IA
   
Children of CHRISTEN PEDERSON and BRITA JOKUMSDATTER are:
5.    i.    PETER6 CHRISTIANSON, b. 28 May 1820, Tjernagel Søre Farm, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway; d. 08 Mar 1896, LaSalle County, Illinois.
6.    ii.    JOKUM CHRISTENSEN, b. 15 Feb 1822, Norway; d. 01 Dec 1904, Milwaukee, WI.
    iii.    HELGA CHRISTENSDATTER, b. 1825, Tjernagel Søre Farm, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway; d. 1825, Tjernagel Søre Farm, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway.
7.    iv.    MALINDA (MALENE OR MALENA) CHRISTIANSON, b. 12 May 1827, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway; d. 10 Jul 1896, Iowa.

   
Children of CHRISTEN PEDERSON and MARI ANDERSDATTER are:
8.    v.    ANDERS6 CHRISTIANSON, b. 17 Oct 1831, Tjernagel, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway; d. 17 Sep 1910, Iowa.
9.    vi.    ANDREW (ENDRE) CHRISTIANSON, b. 05 Mar 1834, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway; d. 25 Jul 1922, Scott Twp, Hamilton County, Iowa.
    vii.    HELGE CHRISTIANSON, b. 08 Jun 1837, Tjernagel, Hordaland, Norway; d. 14 Jul 1856, Probably Illinois.

Notes for HELGE CHRISTIANSON:
Apparently emigrated to the USA with Ole Andreas Larson Tjernagel and oth er Tjernagel residents in 1856 and likely died shortly after the party arr ived in LaSalle County, Illinois.

10.    viii.    CHRISTIAN CHRISTIANSON LOGAN, b. 19 Apr 1841, Tjernagel, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway; d. 11 Oct 1926, Story County, IA.
11.    ix.    BERTHA MARIE CHRISTIANSON, b. 26 Apr 1844, Hordaland, Norway; d. 1933, Iowa.
12.    x.    ELLEN KRISTINE CHRISTIANSON, b. 21 Feb 1847, Tjernagel, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway; d. 19 Mar 1882.


3.  KRISTI5 PEDERSDATTER (PEDER4 ANDERSSON, ANDERS3 HALVARDSON, HALVARD2 ANDERSSON, ANDERS1 HANSSON) was born 1797 in Lio (Lien) Farm, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway, and died 1888 in Illinois.  She married PHILLIPUS (PHILIP) KNUDSEN in Norway, son of KNUD PHILLIPSEN and ANNA LARSDATTER.  He was born 1799 in Lien Farm, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway, and died 03 Mar 1871 in Story County, Iowa.

More About KRISTI PEDERSDATTER:
Emigration: 1850, Bergen on bark "Therese".
Immigration: 28 Aug 1850, New York on bark "Therese".

Notes for PHILLIPUS (PHILIP) KNUDSEN:
NOTE COURTESY OF MILDRID TJERNAGEL NICKSON.   TRANSLATION BY ERLING T. TEIGEN:

From Bygdebok fra Sveio: Filippus kjopte bruket i 1820 or var brukar t il h an selde i 1850 og drog til Amerika med huslyden.

Ein dag i juni manad i 1844 vart Filippus og huslyden hans overfal ne av e it fantefylgje, det sakalla "Valborglaget". Fantane var fulle og d en ei ne provde a gjera valdtekt mot ei 14 ar gamal dotter i huset. Det k om t il slagsmal mellom to av fantane of Filippus og Halvard Tjernagel s om v ar hja Filippus. Dei matte henta hjelp fra Tjernagel, og til sist fe kk d ei overmanna fantane or binda dei. Dagen etter vart dei forde til skr ivarg arden.

TRANSLATION:

From Sveio farm history book:  Filippus (Philip Knutsen) bought the farm in 1820 and farmed it until he sold it in 1850 and moved to America with the family.

One day in June 1844 Filippus and his family were attacked by a band of scoundrels, the so-called Valborg gang.  The gang was drunk and one of them tried to rape a 14 year old daughter in the house.  There was then a fistfight between two of the gang and Filippus and Halvard Tjernagel who was with Filippus.  They had to get help from Tjernagel and finally they subdued the gang and tied them up.  The day after they were taken to the justice of the peace.

(The 14 year old would have been Anna Maria.  "Halvard" may have been Haldor Johannessen.)

More About PHILLIPUS (PHILIP) KNUDSEN:
Burial: 1871, Fairview Cemetery, Story City, Iowa
Emigration: 1850, Bergen on bark "Therese".
Immigration: 28 Aug 1850, New York on bark "Therese".
   
Children of KRISTI PEDERSDATTER and PHILLIPUS KNUDSEN are:
13.    i.    ANNA MARIE6 PHILLIPSDATTER, b. 1830, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway; d. 12 Aug 1852, Wisconsin.
14.    ii.    HELGA (HELEN PHILLOPS) PHILLIPSDATTER, b. 19 Jul 1832, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway; d. 27 Oct 1909, Seneca, IL.
15.    iii.    CANUTE (KNUT PHILLIPS) PHILLOPS, b. 12 Sep 1834, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway; d. 02 Apr 1906, Iowa.
    iv.    PETER PHILLIPS, b. 11 Sep 1836, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway; d. 01 Dec 1863, Murfreesboro, TN, USA.

Notes for PETER PHILLIPS:
CIVIL WAR SERVICE:

From entry in Vesterheim Museum database - Norwegians in the Civil War:
Illinois 36th Infantry, Company F.  Enlisted 2 Sep 1861 at Aurora, Ka ne co unty, IL.  Described as unmarried, age 25, blue eyes, blue (sic) hai r, da rk complexion, 5'7" tall.  Enlisted for three years.
Died of "diarrhea" 1 Dec 1863 at Murfreesboro, Tennessee (source Illi no is State Archives reel 3, p. 72).

Wounded, died in a hospital.  Brother of Knut Phillips (source Ulvesta d, p .323).

NOTES ON ILLINOIS 36TH INFANTRY:

The THIRTY-SIXTH INFANTRY ILLINOIS VOLUNTEERS was organized at Camp Hamm on d, near Aurora, Ill., by Colonel N. Greusel, and was mustered into t he ser vice by Colonel Brackett, U.S. Mustering Officer, September 23, 186 1, f or a term of three years, or during the war. The Regiment numbered 9 65 off icers and enlisted men, and had two companies of Cavalry, ("A" a nd "B") 1 86 officers and men. On September 24, moved via Quincy, III ., to St. Loui s, Mo., where the companies of Infantry were armed. Compani es "A" and " B" receiving Minnie and Enfield rifles, the other companies r emodeled Spri ngfield muskets caliber 69.

In general engagements alone the Thirty-sixth (Infantry) Regime nt lo st in killed and wounded over 700 men. It was reinforced by 221 recr uits a nd drafted men. It marched and was transported by rail and boat ov er 10,0 00 miles during its term of service, Changed commanding officers t en time s, yet it maintained throughout its term of service the espr it de cor ps of its original organization.

Regimental Commanders included Lieutenant Colonel Porter C. Olson.*

SOURCE:  Illinois Adjutant General's Report, Regimental and Unit Histor ie s, Years 1861-1866.  Illinois State Archives.
*See notes for Porter Olson in this family tree.

MORE ON PETER PHILLIPS (PHILLOPS):
Excerpt of story authored by Peder Gustav Tjernagel, 1931.  Provided cou rt esy of Mildrid Tjernagel Nickson.

When the Civil War broke out old Kjersteen's boys, Knute and Peter, we re b oth old enough to go into the service. She had many forbodings, bei ng acqu ainted with their adventurous nature, fearing they would join t he army. Su re enough at the very first opportunity, Knute enlisted in t he 36th Illino is regiment. Just at this time Peter was back in Wisconsi n, working in a l umber camp. His mother was hoping against hope that he w ould receive no in formation as to the step Knute had take, but not s o. He came home quite un expectedly, and forthwith joined the same regimen t. They tried to conso le their mother by saying, this war won't last lo ng and we will soon be ba ck with you again.

The spinning wheel paused again. Her baby boy, Peter, never came bac k. Pe te fought in seven of the big battles of the Civil War. Among othe rs c an be mentioned the battle of Missionary Ridge.

More About PETER PHILLIPS:
Burial: Site #6918, Stones River National Battlefield, Murfreesboro, TN
Emigration: 1850, Bergen on bark "Therese".
Immigration: 28 Aug 1850, New York on bark "Therese".
Military service: Bet. 1861 - 1863, Civil War - see notes


4.  HELGA5 PEDERSDATTER (PEDER4 ANDERSSON, ANDERS3 HALVARDSON, HALVARD2 ANDERSSON, ANDERS1 HANSSON) was born Abt. 1803 in Lio (Lien) Farm, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway, and died 29 May 1851 in Tjernagel, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway.  She married LARS JOHANNESSEN 29 Jun 1823 in Hordaland, Norway, son of JOHANNES OLESEN and GUNILDE HALDORSDATTER.  He was born 10 Aug 1794 in Hordaland, Norway, and died 22 Apr 1863 in Tjernagel, Hordaland, Norway.

Notes for HELGA PEDERSDATTER:
Finnås burial records indicate that Helga Pedersdatter died at t he a ge of 50-1/2 in 1851.  Farm name at time of death was Tjernagel.

More About HELGA PEDERSDATTER:
Burial: 06 Jul 1851, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway

More About LARS JOHANNESSEN:
Burial: 17 May 1863, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway
   
Children of HELGA PEDERSDATTER and LARS JOHANNESSEN are:
    i.    JOHANNES6 LARSON, b. 02 Nov 1823, Lien Farm, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway; d. 22 Jun 1850, Tjernagel Nordre Farm, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway.
16.    ii.    PEDER (STORE PER) LARSON, b. 12 Feb 1826, Lien Farm, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway; d. 28 Feb 1863, Iowa.
17.    iii.    GUNHILDE LARSDATTER, b. Aug 1828, Lien Farm, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway; d. May 1855, Tjernagel Nordre Farm, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway.
18.    iv.    HELEN (HELGA) MARIE LARSDATTER, b. 18 Aug 1830, Hordaland, Norway; d. 26 Sep 1897, Iowa.
    v.    OLE ANDREAS LARSON, b. 1834, Lien Farm, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway; d. 1834.
19.    vi.    OLE ANDREAS LARSON TJERNAGEL, b. 10 Apr 1836, Lien Farm, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway; d. 12 May 1919, Follinglo Farm, Scott Twp, Hamilton County, Iowa.
20.    vii.    BARBRU LARSDATTER, b. 14 Oct 1839, Lien Farm, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway; d. 05 Nov 1926, Story City, Story County, Iowa.
21.    viii.    LARSINE LARSDATTER, b. 09 Jul 1842, Lien Farm, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway; d. 27 Jun 1927, USA.


Generation No. 3

5.  PETER6 CHRISTIANSON (CHRISTEN5 PEDERSON, PEDER4 ANDERSSON, ANDERS3 HALVARDSON, HALVARD2 ANDERSSON, ANDERS1 HANSSON) was born 28 May 1820 in Tjernagel Søre Farm, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway, and died 08 Mar 1896 in LaSalle County, Illinois.  He married (1) BIRTHE MARIE HALDORSDATTER 05 Apr 1846 in Tjernagel, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway, daughter of HALDOR JOHANNESSEN and ANNA OSMUNDSDATTER.  She was born 18 Jan 1821 in Tjernagel Nordre Farm, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway, and died 20 Jul 1849 in La Salle County, IL.  He married (2) LOWRAY (LOUISA OR LOUISE) THOMPSON 01 Jul 1853 in Norway, IL.  She was born Abt. 1803 in Norway, and died 12 Jan 1891 in La Salle County, IL.

More About PETER CHRISTIANSON:
Burial: Norway Cemetery, LaSalle County, IL
Emigration: 16 May 1849, Stavanger, Norway on Brig "Favoriten"
Immigration: 28 Jun 1849, New York on Brig "Favoriten"

Notes for BIRTHE MARIE HALDORSDATTER:
It is suspected that she died in the cholera epidemic that swept the F ox R iver Valley of Illinois in 1849.  Many Norwegian immigrants died in t his e pidemic.

More About BIRTHE MARIE HALDORSDATTER:
Burial: Norway Cemetery, LaSalle County, IL
Emigration: 16 May 1849, Stavanger, Norway on Brig "Favoriten"
Immigration: 28 Jun 1849, New York on Brig "Favoriten"

More About LOWRAY (LOUISA OR LOUISE) THOMPSON:
Burial: Norway Cemetery, LaSalle County, IL
   
Children of PETER CHRISTIANSON and BIRTHE HALDORSDATTER are:
    i.    GIRL7 PEDERSDATTER, b. 20 May 1846, Tjernagel, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway; d. 20 May 1846, Tjernagel, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway.
22.    ii.    OLE ANDREAS CHRISTIANSON, b. 23 May 1847, Tjernagel Søre Farm, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway; d. 08 May 1911, USA.
23.    iii.    CHRISTIAN PEDER (C P) CHRISTIANSON, b. 14 Sep 1848, Lien Farm near Tjernagel, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway; d. 11 May 1913, Iowa City, IA.


6.  JOKUM6 CHRISTENSEN (CHRISTEN5 PEDERSON, PEDER4 ANDERSSON, ANDERS3 HALVARDSON, HALVARD2 ANDERSSON, ANDERS1 HANSSON) was born 15 Feb 1822 in Norway, and died 01 Dec 1904 in Milwaukee, WI.  He married (1) ANNA OSMUNDSDATTER 06 Apr 1847 in Tjernagel, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway.  She was born Abt. 1825 in Norway, and died 1857 in Wisconsin.  He married (2) KARENA (CAROLINE) JOHNSON 07 Nov 1858, daughter of OSSA.  She was born 09 Apr 1832 in Norway, and died 18 Sep 1898 in Milwaukee, WI.

Notes for JOKUM CHRISTENSEN:
Note by Peder Gustave Tjernagel, 1931, courtesy of Mildrid Tjernagel Nickson:

Jokum became...a well known and well to do business man of Milwaukee, Wi sconsin. Was known there as Captain Christensen.

More About JOKUM CHRISTENSEN:
Burial: 1904, Forest Home Cemetery, Milwaukee, WI
Census: 1870, Milwaukee City and County, WI
Emigration: 1852, Schooner "Rogaland" departed Stavanger April 21, 1852.
Immigration: 1852, Schooner "Rogaland" arrived New York June 10, 1852.
Occupation: Bet. 1860 - 1870, Sailor

More About ANNA OSMUNDSDATTER:
Emigration: 1852, Schooner "Rogaland" departed Stavanger April 21, 1852.
Immigration: 1852, Schooner "Rogaland" arrived New York June 10, 1852.

Notes for KARENA (CAROLINE) JOHNSON:
Vitals courtesy of Mildrid Nickson.

More About KARENA (CAROLINE) JOHNSON:
Burial: 21 Sep 1898, Forest Home Cemetery, Milwaukee, WI
   
Children of JOKUM CHRISTENSEN and ANNA OSMUNDSDATTER are:
24.    i.    CHRISTEN7 CHRISTENSEN, b. 28 May 1847, Tjernagel, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway; d. 16 Apr 1917, Milwaukee, WI.
    ii.    OSMUND CHRISTENSEN, b. Abt. 1850, Norway; d. Bef. 1852, Norway.
    iii.    OSSELINA (CELIA) CHRISTENSEN, b. Abt. 1856, Wisconsin.

   
Children of JOKUM CHRISTENSEN and KARENA JOHNSON are:
25.    iv.    ANNA OLIVE7 CHRISTENSEN, b. 11 Jun 1859, Wisconsin; d. 04 Feb 1916.
    v.    BERTHA (BERTIE) CHRISTENSEN, b. 19 Apr 1861, Wisconsin; d. 20 Dec 1952, Whitehall, MI.
    vi.    THEODORE JOHAN CHRISTENSEN, b. Bef. 1864; d. 1864.

More About THEODORE JOHAN CHRISTENSEN:
Burial: 30 Jul 1864, Forest Home Cemetery, Milwaukee, WI

26.    vii.    THEODORE JOHAN CHRISTENSEN, b. 15 Feb 1866, Milwaukee, Wisconsin; d. 18 Jul 1905, Milwaukee, WI.
    viii.    JOACHIM CHRISTENSEN, b. 1869, Wisconsin.


7.  MALINDA (MALENE OR MALENA)6 CHRISTIANSON (CHRISTEN5 PEDERSON, PEDER4 ANDERSSON, ANDERS3 HALVARDSON, HALVARD2 ANDERSSON, ANDERS1 HANSSON) was born 12 May 1827 in Sveio, Hordaland, Norway, and died 10 Jul 1896 in Iowa.  She married (1) PEDER (STORE PER) LARSON 13 Apr 1852 in Sveio Kirke, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway, son of LARS JOHANNESSEN and HELGA PEDERSDATTER.  He was born 12 Feb 1826 in Lien Farm, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway, and died 28 Feb 1863 in Iowa.  She married (2) CANUTE (KNUT PHILLIPS) PHILLOPS 09 Jul 1865 in Story County, Iowa, son of PHILLIPUS KNUDSEN and KRISTI PEDERSDATTER.  He was born 12 Sep 1834 in Sveio, Hordaland, Norway, and died 02 Apr 1906 in Iowa.

More About MALINDA (MALENE OR MALENA) CHRISTIANSON:
Burial: Mamrelund Cemetery, Scott Twp, Hamilton County, IA
Census: 1870, Scott Township, Hamilton County, Iowa
Emigration: 1852, Schooner "Rogaland" departed Stavanger April 21, 1852.
Immigration: 1852, Schooner "Rogaland" arrived New York June 10, 1852.

Notes for PEDER (STORE PER) LARSON:
DEATH OF PETER (PEER) LARSON

Excerpt of story authored by Peder Gustav Tjernagel.  Provided courtesy of Mildrid Tjernagel Nickson.

Many things could be told about this interesting and powerful pioneer, but old Kjersteen is waiting for us, down in the Fox River settlemen t. I am very sorry to have to chronicle the following, the saddest part of our story. Peer and Madaline's oldest girl, age seven, was caught in a prairie fire and burned to death. This tragedy was a terrible ha rd blow to the stricken parents, and the good neighbors as well. A nd sadder still, Peer, after the first severe pangs of sorrow had subsided some, wanted to buy something for his remaining girl and his wife. The nearest trading point was Marshalltown, a distance of 45 miles. He h ad no ready cash, but he had one hog. This hog he butchered, loaded same into his wagon and started out for Marshalltown, where he figured on doing some bartering. He came as far as about where the town of Yeering now is situated, when he was suddenly stricken with a severe pain in his abdomen. His otherwise powerful hands let go of the reins, and his spirited horses started to run. But fortunately there were others on the road w ho caught his te am. Seeing his helpless condition, they carried him in to a house nearby, where in spite of all that could be done for him by those good people, he died inside of an hour. He reached the age of thirty-six years. (This took place in the year 1863.)

Peder Gustav Tjernagel, 1931

More About PEDER (STORE PER) LARSON:
Burial: Boe Cemetery, Hamilton County, Iowa
Emigration: 1852, Schooner "Rogaland" departed Stavanger April 21, 1852.
Immigration: 1852, Schooner "Rogaland" arrived New York June 10, 1852.

Notes for CANUTE (KNUT PHILLIPS) PHILLOPS:
BIOGRAPHY:
Transcription of entry on page 371 of "Biographical Record and Portrait Album of Webster and Hamilton Counties, Iowa", The Lewis Publishing Company, Chicago, 1888.

CANUTE PHILLOPS, section 33, Scott Township, was born in Bergen, Norway, S eptember 12, 1834, a son of Canute and Sistena Phillops.  When he was sixteen years old his parents came to the United States, landing in N ew York after a voyage of ten weeks and three days.  They went direct to Dane County, Wisconsin, but a year later moved to LaSalle County, Illinois, and bought a house and lot, and also some cattle, which the father cared for while the sons worked on farms by the month.  The parents h ad a family of four children - Anna M., Helen, Canute and Peter.  In August, 1861, the sons enlisted in Company F, Thirty-sixth Illinois Infantry, and Peter died in the hospital at Murfreesboro in February, 1864.   Canute was with his regiment in the battles of Pea Ridge, Perryville and Stone River, and at the latter place was taken prisoner, but was paroled and sent to Annapolis, Maryland, where he was on provost duty until June, 1863.  He joined his regiment just before the battle at Mission Ridge and took part in that contest.  At the battle of Adairsville he received a gun-shot wound in his thigh, and was in hospitals at Nashville, Loui sville, Madison, Indiana, and at Camp Butler, Springfield, Illinois.  He was discharged on the expiration of his term of servce in September, 1864, and returned to La Salle County.  A few weeks later he came to Hamilton County, Iowa, and set tled in Scott Township, where he engaged in farming.  July 9, 1865, he married Mrs. Melinda (Christianson) Larson, who owned at that time a farm of eighty acres, partly improved.  This land Mr. Phillops has improved and has added to it until the farm now consists of 400 acres of fine land, and the residence and other buildings are among the best in the township.  Their residence was built in 1878 at a cost of $1,800.  Mr. and Mrs. Phillops have one child - Peter M ., born January 18, 1869.  A daughter, Patrie C., is deceased.  Mrs. Phil lops has one daughter by her first marriage, Bertha.  In politics Mr. Phillops is a Republican.  He has serv ed as a township trustee and school tr easurer.  He is a member of t he G. A. R. post in Story City, and he and his wife are members of the Lutheran church.

CIVIL WAR SERVICE:
From entry in Vesterheim Museum database - Norwegians in the Civil War:
Illinois 36th Infantry Company F.
Enlisted 18 August 1861 at Newark, Kendall County, IL.  Described as unm arried, age 27, gray eyes, light hair, fair complexion, 5'8" tall.  Enlisted for three years.  Mustered out 4 October 1864 at Springfield, IL.  ( source Illinois State Archives reel 3, p.72).

Wounded and taken prisoner (source Ulvestad p. 323).

NOTES ON ILLINOIS 36TH INFANTRY:
The THIRTY-SIXTH INFANTRY ILLINOIS VOLUNTEERS was organized at Camp Hammond, near Aurora, Ill., by Colonel N. Greusel, and was mustered into the ser vice by Colonel Brackett, U.S. Mustering Officer, September 23, 186 1, f or a term of three years, or during the war. The Regiment numbered 965 officers and enlisted men, and had two companies of Cavalry, ("A" a nd "B") 186 officers and men. On September 24, moved via Quincy, III ., to St. Loui s, Mo., where the companies of Infantry were armed. Compani es "A" and " B" receiving Minnie and Enfield rifles, the other companies remodeled Spri ngfield muskets caliber 69.

In general engagements alone the Thirty-sixth (Infantry) Regiment lost in killed and wounded over 700 men. It was reinforced by 221 recruits and drafted men. It marched and was transported by rail and boat ov er 10,000 miles during its term of service, Changed commanding officers ten time s, yet it maintained throughout its term of service the esprit de corps of its original organization.

Regimental Commanders included Lieutenant Colonel Porter C. Olson.*

SOURCE:  Illinois Adjutant General's Report, Regimental and Unit Histories, Years 1861-1866.  Illinois State Archives.
*See notes for Porter Olson in this family tree.

MORE ON CANUTE (KNUTE) PHILLIPS (PHILLOPS):
Excerpt of story authored by Peder Gustav Tjernagel, 1931.  Provided courtesy of Mildrid Tjernagel Nickson.

When the Civil War broke out old Kjersteen's boys, Knute and Peter, we re both old enough to go into the service. She had many forbodings, bei ng acquainted with their adventurous nature, fearing they would join t he army. Sure enough at the very first opportunity, Knute enlisted in the 36th Illino is regiment. Just at this time Peter was back in Wisconsin, working in a lumber camp. His mother was hoping against hope that he would receive no information as to the step Knute had take, but not so. He came home quite unexpectedly, and forthwith joined the same regiment. They tried to console their mother by saying, this war won't last long and we will soon be back with you again.

The spinning wheel paused again. Her baby boy, Peter, never came back. Pete fought in seven of the big battles of the Civil War. Among others can be mentioned the battle of Missionary Ridge. (Knute) participated in the battle above the clouds on Lookout Mountain, was wounded but soon got back into action again, was taken prisoner at the battle of Stone River, was sent to Libby Prison where he suffered many tortures before he was liberated.

After the war was over Knute came back home to his parents, in the Fox R iver settlement, Illinois. He was very much grieved on hearing of Peter 's death. Being a man of action, and quick decisions, he made the remark, we go to Iowa as quick as we can get there.

This plan was soon realized for by this time, there were railroad accommodations clear to Nevada, in Story County. Knute soon had his father, mother and his two nieces, Dorothy and Kjersteen, comfortably establi shed on a little farm of his one half mile north of Story City, he himself taking over the management of Madaline's (Peer's widow) farm. Later he married the widow. By his foresight, good management and hard work, he added tract after tract of land to the original eighty, so that at the time of his death he had a well improved farm of four hundred acres, and a very handsome sum of money in the bank.

More About CANUTE (KNUT PHILLIPS) PHILLOPS:
Burial: 1906, Mamrelund Cemetery, Story County, Iowa
Emigration: 1850, Bergen on bark "Therese".
Immigration: 28 Aug 1850, New York on bark "Therese".
Military service: Bet. 1861 - 1864, Civil War - see notes
   
Children of MALINDA CHRISTIANSON and PEDER LARSON are:
    i.    HELGA7 LARSON, b. 21 Mar 1853, LaSalle County, Illinois; d. 24 Oct 1859, Scott Township, Hamilton County, Iowa.

More About HELGA LARSON:
Burial: Likely "Norsk Utvandrergravlund", Fairview Farm, Section 33, Scott Twp, Hamilton County, IA
Cause of death (Facts Pg): 1859, Burned to death in prairie fire.

    ii.    CHRISTEN JOHAN LARSON, b. 11 Apr 1856; d. 28 May 1857, Scott Township, Hamilton County, Iowa.

More About CHRISTEN JOHAN LARSON:
Burial: Likely "Norsk Utvandrergravlund", Fairview Farm, Section 33, Scott Twp, Hamilton County, IA

27.    iii.    BERTHA CHRISTINE LARSON, b. 29 May 1859, Hamilton County, Iowa; d. 15 Nov 1932, Story City, Iowa.
    iv.    LARS JOHAN LARSON, b. 03 Apr 1861, Iowa; d. 17 Dec 1861, Scott Township, Hamilton County, Iowa.

More About LARS JOHAN LARSON:
Burial: Likely "Norsk Utvandrergravlund", Fairview Farm, Section 33, Scott Twp, Hamilton County, IA

    v.    PEDER LARSON, b. 18 Feb 1863, Iowa; d. 15 Aug 1863, Iowa.

   
Children of MALINDA CHRISTIANSON and CANUTE PHILLOPS are:
    vi.    PATRIE (PETRA) C.7 PHILLOPS, b. 1866, Iowa; d. 1866, Iowa.

More About PATRIE (PETRA) C. PHILLOPS:
Burial: 1866, Boe Cemetery, IA

28.    vii.    PETER MARTIN PHILLOPS, b. 18 Jan 1869, Scott Twp, Hamilton County, Iowa; d. 26 Mar 1936, Story City, Story County, Iowa.


8.  ANDERS6 CHRISTIANSON (CHRISTEN5 PEDERSON, PEDER4 ANDERSSON, ANDERS3 HALVARDSON, HALVARD2 ANDERSSON, ANDERS1 HANSSON) was born 17 Oct 1831 in Tjernagel, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway, and died 17 Sep 1910 in Iowa.  He married HELEN (HELGA) MARIE LARSDATTER 29 Mar 1853 in Hordaland, Norway, daughter of LARS JOHANNESSEN and HELGA PEDERSDATTER.  She was born 18 Aug 1830 in Hordaland, Norway, and died 26 Sep 1897 in Iowa.

Notes for ANDERS CHRISTIANSON:
BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD AND PORTRAIT ALBUM OF WEBSTER AND HAMILTON COUNTIES,  IOWA
The Lewis Publishing Company, Chicago, 1888, pages 280-281

ANDERS CHRISTIANSON, one of the well-known pioneers pf Scott Township, resides on section 20, where he owns 140 acres, and also owns 240 acres adjoining on section 21, making a fine farm of 380 acres.  His land was new when he settled on it, and he has made all the improvements and now has a beautiful home.  He has a good residence and substantial farm buildi ngs and fine groves of trees, where once was a treeless prairie.  Mr. Christianson was born in Norway, October 17, 1831.  His father, Christian Peterson, died when he was a boy.  He was reared in his native country, and was there married to Helen Larson.  In 1854 he came to America, landing in Quebec, and proceeded direct to La Salle County, Illinois, whe re a brother and sister had already located.  In 1857 he came with his brother-in-law, Peter Larson, to Hamilton County, and they enjoy the honor of being the first settlers of Scott Township.  A sister, Mrs. Phillops, was the first of the family to come to the county.  He worked for others at farm work for some time before buying his land, and also worked a farm in section 3, belonging to Albert Hall, on shares, and in 1864 bought his present farm.  When Mr. Christianson came to Iowa he had not money enough to pay the expense of bringing his family from Illinois, and his prosperity is due to his industry and good management.  Mr. and Mrs. Christianson have had four children.  A son and daughter died in early chi ldhood.  Another son, Lars, was killed on the farm in 1864, aged nine years.  Their only living child, Christian J., was born in La Salle County, Illinois, October 26, 1855, and still lives with his parents.  Mr. Christianson and his son are adherents of the Republican party.  The family are members of the Lutheran church.  Mr. Christianson is one of the highly respected men of the township, which he has assisted so materially to develop, and is now reaping the reward of his early years of toil and hardship.

More About ANDERS CHRISTIANSON:
Burial: Mamrelund Cemetery, Scott Twp, Hamilton County, IA
Census: 1860, Story City, Norway Twp, Hamilton County, IA
   
Children of ANDERS CHRISTIANSON and HELEN LARSDATTER are:
    i.    HELGA7 CHRISTIANSON, b. 02 Jun 1853; d. 14 Aug 1854.
    ii.    JOHANNES CHRISTIANSON, b. 15 Aug 1854.
29.    iii.    CHRISTIAN JOHAN CHRISTIANSON, b. 26 Oct 1855, Illinois; d. 16 May 1911, Randall, Iowa.
    iv.    LARS CHRISTIANSON, b. 1857, Iowa; d. 1864, Scott Township, Hamilton County, Iowa.

Notes for LARS CHRISTIANSON:
DEATH OF LARS CHRISTIANSON:

Introduction by Phil Rhodes:

The following story, written by Nehemias Tjernagel as part of his monument al manuscript “The Passing of the Prairie – by A Fossil”, concerns the tra gic death in 1864 of seven year old Lars Christianson, son of Anders Chris tianson and Helga Larsdatter Christianson.  Anders was the younger half-brother of Christianson-Tjernagel patriarch Peter Christianson and Helga was the sister of Larson-Tjernagel patriarch Ole Andreas Larson.

Anders and Helga were a kind and generous couple, and are still remember ed as such by descendants of the Norwegian pioneers of Scott Township in the southeast corner of Iowa’s Hamilton County.  But, as this story illustr ates, they and their immediate family were beset by tragedy.  So beset that there are no living descendants of Anders and Helga.

Anders outlived his wife, passing away in 1910.  Within months of his death, Anders’ sole surviving offspring, Christen Johan Christianson, followed his father.  Christen Johan had one child, a daughter.  She died in 1920, before bearing any children.

Nehemias’ tale of Lars’ death was written circa 1923.  The manuscript, “Passing of the Prairie…” it is part of, was manually typed in double-space by Nehemias.  It is a draft and as such contains a fair number of typographic errors.  I have taken the liberty of correcting the typographical errors and making a very few minor word and punctuation changes that I hope Nehemias would approve of.

The death of Lars Christianson – by Nehemias Tjernagel:

A great bereavement came to Anders and Helga Christenson when their son Lars was crushed to death in a soil roller.  Their eldest son, Christen, had been sent into a nearby field to drive the roller back and forth on ground to be made smooth for corn planting.  There was no seat for the driver, and Christen had been warned not to attempt to stand on the frame as an accidental lurch might easily throw him forward upon the roller and thus cause him to be wedged between it and the frame.  He had obeyed instructions and all had gone well till his little brother Lars appear ed on the scene.  The youngster was cutting across lots on his way to school and, chancing upon his brother at work in the field, begged to be allowed to make one round while the other rested.  Consent was reluctantly given, and the parental warning to be careful doubly reiterated, whereupon the little fellow delightedly sang out:  “Gidap Charley and Flora, gidup, I say!”  Whether the diminutive driver found it difficult to keep pace with the team and the warning not to mount the frame forgotten, we can only conjecture; but mount the frame he did.  Alas, tragedy followed!  Lars promptly tumbled into the death trap, his legs and body being squeezed through till finally his head was reached and held fast as in a vise.  Anders, horrified, witnessed the gruesome spectacle from the farm house, rushed to the scene, and with a superhuman strength wrenched with bare hands the heavy frame apart.  He saw his beloved son give one lingering final gasp and life was gone.  The roller was abandoned where it stood and rotted away to oblivion among the tall weeds that grew up and enshrouded it.

Anders, in telling of the experience to us children years afterward, said that the agony he had lived through at the time was unspeakable and not comparable to other trials.  He and Helga had, he told us, lost their first child from cholera upon landing in this country and had themselves been at death’s door from the disease.  They had fought the pangs of near starvation upon settling here in the fifties (1850s), but the untimely, woeful death of little Lars had affected them most of all.

Our good old friend said he could not but wonder at himself in being able to tear apart that heavy roller frame with the bare strength of his hands.  It seemed impossible, yet he could not deny the evidence of his own senses.  Not only from him, modest man that he was, but from others who have had similar experiences.  In great emergencies it seems as if one were endowed with far more than common strength while the frenzy of acute distress lasts.  Nor have I heard of anyone being fully conscious of what he was doing while in the throes of such abnormal effort.

More About LARS CHRISTIANSON:
Census: 1860, Story City, Norway Twp, Hamilton County, IA


9.  ANDREW (ENDRE)6 CHRISTIANSON (CHRISTEN5 PEDERSON, PEDER4 ANDERSSON, ANDERS3 HALVARDSON, HALVARD2 ANDERSSON, ANDERS1 HANSSON) was born 05 Mar 1834 in Sveio, Hordaland, Norway, and died 25 Jul 1922 in Scott Twp, Hamilton County, Iowa.  He married JULIA NELSON 1860 in Illinois, daughter of JONAS NELSON and SOPHIA HETLETVEDT.  She was born Abt. 1842 in Illinois, and died 1912.

Notes for ANDREW (ENDRE) CHRISTIANSON:
BIOGRAPHY:
Excerpt from "ENDRE CHRISTENSON, AND OTHERS" by Nehemias Tjernagel:

Endre was born in the year 1834 at Tjernagel, district of Sveen, Norway.  He lived with his parents till he reached the age of confirmation, when he was placed in the home of his uncle, Haldor Tjernagel.  As he was rather awkward and bashful he disliked the change for fear of being called upon to appear in the role of reader at the religious gatherings often held there.  Having at this time a chance to earn a whole dollar by joini ng a fishing excursion, he snapped at the opportunity and left his uncle.

Through with this venture, he collected the dollar, donned his best clothes, packed his kit, and surreptiously left the paternal home of the fishing hamlet, Haugesund, seventeen miles distant.  Arrived there he sought t he village store which he found filled to overflowing with fisherman and f ellows about town, many of whom were coarse and vulgar.  The establishment was unkempt and uninviting.  He at once grew homesick and, hastily departing, walked into the darkness of night with a lump in his throat and nowhere to go.

As he approached a light near the wharf he found himself peering through t he window of a sailor's house.  He knocked with some trepidation, was admitted, and found himself in the home of a relative of the noted evangelist, Hans Nielson Hauge.  He was made welcome for the night, and the next morning was berthed aboard the host's and brother's fishing smack loaded with herring for Stavanger.

Endre was persuaded by a large, muscular youth who was working his passa ge to lend him his dollar, but when he chanced to come upon him tying his bundle to skip ashore, it occurred to our friend that had seen the la st of his money, forsoot, he recovered it there and then.  Upon demanding it he was blithely told that he need not worry as he would soon receive it.  Endre wanted it on the spot.  "Nix", said the other, whereupon Endre grabbed him by the neck, flung him to the floor and sat upon him.  At this juncture the Captain appeared.  Our hero grew unspeakably alarmed, fearing that his action might lead to arrest.  Hearing the reason for the altercation, the Captain sided with Endre, and the rascal received his deserts and Endre his silver.

Wishing to become a sailor, he sought the office of the Sea Commissioner to obtain the papers required for such a vocation.  Unused to office et iquette he did not knock, but unannounced entered by mistake an apartme nt occupied by a couple of spinsters who set up a lusty screaming at the s ight of the rather ungainly looking visitor who had so unexpectedly dropped in on them.  He was ejected from the room without ceremony and heard t he door-lock click behind him, whereupon, looking furtively about, he beca me aware of a pair of keen eyes regarding him fixedly through a slit in the next door.  He blurted out his errand, the door swung open, and he w as invited to remove his hat and enter.  He was granted his sea-patent forthwith and he emerged from the office feeling that he was of some importance in the world.

After a few weeks' experience in sailing, which he found to be minus poetry and decidedly prosaic, he abandoned the ship and returned home to finish his work in the confirmation class.   Sad to say, many a lesson went unlearned; and not a few in the large classes those days succeeded in outwitting the overworked minister and slipped through to confirmation mostly on appearances.  Fortunately a considerable number took the work seriously and it became a blessed influence in their subsequent lives.

After confirmation, considering himself quite as grown up as anybody, he d etermined to cast his fortunes with the sea once more.  He looked for a position commensurate with his new-found dignity, but finally accepted the only post available, that of cook and dishwasher, the meanest job on boar d.  He experienced the time-honored onus which attaches to this office a nd became the butt of jokes, spite and ill humor which an unwritten law de creed he must bear uncomplainingly.  Once on a trip to Gothenburg, while t he ship was careening madly in a storm, he was flung in a heap while carrying some victuals and received a broadside of blows from the Captain as his portion.  He was nagged and browbeaten, cursed and cuffed as a daily diversion by mischievous shipmates.  Such was the life of the novice at s ea in those days.

Our friend relates that while the ship tarried at Gothenburg plenty of thieves infested the wharves, and during his shift he kept in agony of apprehension lest they outwit him and make away with the property he had been s et to guard.  Pretty women with beautiful silken head-dresses would hover near with saucy lips and seductive smiles and beg him to take their dainty ‘kerchiefs in exchange for hemp rope-ends, which they unraveled and so ld at a good profit to ship-builders.

Through with his novitiate, Endre gained employment aboard the sloop Nesha sailing from Bommel Island off the eastern (Nehemias likely meant to say “western”) coast of Norway near Tjernagel.  What he relates of his connection with this vessel is of special interest owing to two characters introduced here and designated as the strong men of western Norway, Rejanes of Stavanger and Store Per (Big Pete) of Tjernagel.

We find Endre at the age of seventeen, year 1851 (actually 1852), quitti ng the sea as a sailor and embarking as an immigrant on a sail-ship bound for the United States.  he came in the company of his half-brother, Jokum Christenson and Peder Larson, (Store Per), both newly married.  There were about fifty others in the party from the same district, Sveen, whose d estination was this country.  The ocean voyage lasted seven weeks.  Arriving in New York moneyless, Endre considered taking service on a boat bound for South America, but was induced by Per and his wife (the latter was Endre's half-sister and the former his cousin) to accept fare-money from them and come west in their company.

A small steamer brought them from their ship in New York to Albany.  Fr om this place they were taken by canal-boat to Buffalo and hence by steamb oat to Green Bay, Wisconsin.  A river steamer carried them a distance up the Winnebago river in the direction of Waupaca.  But their passage was mo re or less impeded by logs spanning the river.  Finding, finally, that fur ther progress was impossible, the steamer was turned downstream and the pa ssengers had no choice but to unload their belongings on the river-bank a nd make themselves at home as best they might in the strange surroundings.  With the exception of Jokum, who knew a few words of English, all we re unfamiliar with the language of the country.  Not far from the river th ey discovered a hut on a hill-top where lived a Frenchman and his two squa ws, but he knew no more English than they, and no Norwegian at all; hence there was little or nothing to be learned from him.  Three of the party Jokum, Mr. Nygaard and Mr. Leite, were appointed as scouts to hunt for civilization and obtain help.  Peder Christenson, Endre's half-brother, and Michael Lie, whose wife was Endre's cousin, and come to these parts considerably in advance of the others and were supposed to be located somewhere in this section.  The new immigrants hoped to get their aid to transport their families and belongings to a more promising place.  Store Per was left in charge of the camp.

Forsaken thus in the wildwoods, the little colony suffered both apprehensi on and loneliness, to which was added alarm when a large band of Indians a rriving in canoes after dark landed and surrounded them.  The braves dr ew nigh quietly and watchfully, seemingly torn between timidity and curios ity concerning these strange pale-paces who had invaded their haunts.  Our friends were greatly dismayed, but agreed they must not show fear.  P er remained calm, even smiled in friendly fashion as the Indians ventur ed near them.  They were in full war regalia, and it is not to be wondered at if some of the more timid became uneasy at their approach.  Per bethought himself of his violin, drew it forth and played a few simple melodies.  The war-like host regarded the instrument with grave scrutiny, upon which the women importuned the player to hide it from sight as the warriors might think it a cursed thing with which to invoke evil upon them.  But nothing happened except that the Indians set to work to make fires, fet ched the carcass of a deer and roasted its meat impaled on the ends of stout sticks.  The delicious odor from the roasted venison was most tempting, but none dared ask for a helping.  The uncommunicative visitors finally left as quickly as they had come, but reappeared the next night.  They continued their silence, but their attitude bespoke a keen alertness; nothing that transpired escaped their attention.  The tense, tiring situati on caused the women and children to huddle together on their travelers' chests with wearied hopelessness.  Per, however, continued serene as before, and drew more tune-magic from his stringed talisman, which breathed of brotherly love and bespoke peace to his company and the strange asse mblage about them.  Evidently the Redskins were reached by its message, for soon afterward the band departed in their canoes as noiselessly as they had come; and the forest zephyrs breathed a psalm of deliverance and thanksgiving which found devoted echo in the hearts of our little flock.

With nothing to eat save some stale codfish and a few dry crusts of brea d, the days seemed long before the scouting party returned.  When after th ree days they appeared each with an ox-team, Michael Lie accompanying th em with his own team, there was a happy reunion and no delay in setting o ff for Waupaca, their immediate destination.  Here the three ox teams we re returned to their owners and the little band was left to make the best of it in an abandoned shack, presumably a lumberman's shanty.  A sack of flour was obtained and dumplings of simple ingredients hurriedly ma de to still the pangs of hunger.  But the food proved soggy and hard to digest, making the partakers uncomfortable as they were not accustomed to the highly refined flour in use here.  Several fell sick, among them Per, w ho suffered greatly.  Indeed, they were thoroughly famished for want of suitable food.  Nor could they stomach the rank bacon that they had with difficulty obtained.  That they survived in spite of a lack of the simplest provisions seems strange to us who have ever been blessed with plenty.

According to what Endre remembered there were in the party, besides himself, Filipus Knutson Leo and Kjersti his wife, Johannes Lie and family, Jacob Nygaard and family, Per and his wife, Miss Gondla Slettedne, Carl, a Swede, Jokum Christenson, wife and infant, Steffo Leite, two brothers by the name of Rymgmyr, and their companion, a carpenter.

From Waupaca they were brought a little further on their way by Michael Lie, but as he was unable to transport such a considerable party for any dis tance, they were obliged to halt indefinitely.  As they had no shelter th ey secured some fence-rails which they set up in such a fashion that a covering of hay could be placed on top and around them; and into this makeshift abode as many crowded themselves as the space allowed.  An Aakla (blanket) hung across an opening in the wall served as a door.  Jokum and Per s et up a lean-to of rails on one side of the structure, roofed it over wi th quilts, and spread some hay on the ground for beds.  Endre and his you ng companions remained in the open and caught naps at odd hours.  When it rained they walked briskly to and fro in the wet to keep their join ts from stiffening.

They tarried here for some time till Michael Lie decided to break the mono tony by loading up some shingles which he planned to deliver at the Koshko nong settlement.  As the others couldn’t bear to be left behind, they shou ldered what personal effects Michael couldn’t haul and trailed along aft er him.  Fortunately or unfortunately for Endre, he had abandoned his sea-chest in New York and later his “skrin” (small wooden hand trunk) when landing from the river-boat, so he had but a mere handful to carry.  Per, on the contrary, bore a mammoth burden, and as the distance was some 130 miles it was no pleasure jaunt he entered upon.  Besides he went barefoot to save shoe-leather.  They rested at night on their ankla in favored s pots of grass.  They found difficulty in obtaining sufficient food, but lu ckily milk was generally to be had for the asking from scattered settlers, here and there, whose hearts went out to them in their need.  Only a f ew showed them the cold shoulder.  One woman threw the milk asked for on t he ground when she heard they couldn’t afford to pay her price.  At another place they found a family of professed Christians, who, upon surrendering some of their surplus milk, charged them double price for it.

After a week of travel in this fashion they arrived, footsore and weary at Koshkonong.  Here they found many settlers of their own nationality, this being one of the oldest Norwegian settlements in America.  The pretty hills and dells of this section reminded them of the mountains and valleys in the old country, and with cheer and kindliness shown them on eve ry hand they soon felt themselves at home.

After resting at Koshkonong Jokum and Endre set out afoot for Milwaukee, eighty miles distant.  They had as guide a man who was taking a load of wheat to market, and they followed him a considerable part of the distance.  In one place they halted and worked a whole day for a good meal.  Though they filled themselves to capacity it was not long before they were as hungry as ever.  Temptation to stay their appetites at another’s expense came in the form of an apple orchard, but they had scarcely swallowed the first glorious mouthful of the delicious fruit before some watch-dogs appeared on the scene and took a bite out of them.  They saved most of their skin but continued empty of stomach till they finally reach ed their destination.  They secured a lodging-place, but it proved uninviting enough, for in the morning they found two dead from cholera in the room where they had slept.  Luckily they escaped this dread disease, which w as then raging in the city.  Jokum accepted service at once on a lake vessel as first mate.  Eventually he became a ship-owner himself and one of the influential citizens of Milwaukee.  Endre took hire on the same bo at as a common sailor, plied the lakes on various craft later, then drifted to Chicago, and from there finally made his way to the Fox River settlement in Illinois.

In the year 1858 Endre left Illinois for Iowa in the company of his mother, his two sisters, Helen, later Mrs. Haaver Thorson, and Bertha, later Mrs. Knute Nelson, Erick and Knute Egland, and a Mr. Oino.  They used ox en as their motive power and the trip lasted three weeks.  Lars Henryson, Paul Thompson, Tjernan Charlson (Halsnes), Christen Skarhaug and Mons Grove, all with their families, came at the same time.  Endre's party preferred to travel separately and kept themselves a few miles ahead of the oth ers during the whole journey.  It rained much during their period of travel and they had difficulty in fording swollen streams and in crossing poorly built bridges.

As they reached the Indian reservation near Tama, Iowa, they were join ed by three grocery-haulers who had four oxen with two bulls in lead on each wagon.  In the evening Endre, the grocerymen and others, crossed the ri ver to explore the Indian domicile there.  As they entered the timber they were met by some ferocious Indian dogs that sent them all scurrying wi th the exception of the oldest grocery-peddler, who braved the canines a nd soon whistled for the timid ones to return.  Upon again assembling th ey met face to face with some Indian braves who showed friendship by escor ting them into the deep timber where they were holding a dance and pow-wow.  The visitors were invited to seat themselves on straw mats and witne ss the performance, but they had no sooner accepted the invitation when o ne of the dancers snatched away Endre's hat and he saw himself going bare headed the rest of the journey.  His companions laughed; and he too joined when the circling dancers dexterously gathered up the hats of the re st of the party.  They made a feint as if to conceal them, but suddenly returned them as deftly and unexpectedly as they had been snatched away.

While watching the Indians in their dancing contortions the head grocer suddenly divested himself of his hampering garb, jumped into the swaying cir cle, and joined in the gaieties.  This gave great glee to the entertainer s, the squaws especially.  He took one on each arm, whirled them around, hoisted himself to their shoulders and performed many other antics for the ir entertainment.  Suddenly a stentorian voice broke through the night, whereupon silence fell; and quietly as a whisper the vast throng faded mist- like into the forest, leaving our party bewildered and alone.  The call of the chief ended the merriment for the night.

After buying a farm five and a half miles northeast of Story City, Endre went back to Illinois, ostensibly for the purpose of annexing a wife, and, sure enough, he found a most estimable help-meet in the person of Julia Nelson Solbjor.  They were married in 1860 and made their home permanently on the place he had chosen in Iowa, remaining there till their death, Julia passing away in 1912 and Endre ten years later in his 88th year.  They were church people and died in the realization of God's mercies and in the hope of a better life to come.  Endre was survived by three of his children; eight had preceded him in death.

With an abundance of material blessings, thanks to their thrift and economy, Endre and Julia had been enabled to establish a comfortable home whe re hospitality abounded.  Mother Julia was widely known for her excellent home-making qualities and for her kind concern for all who came and went at her house.  Especially did the many hired hands they had throughout the years testify to this.  We would make particular mention of the large weddings celebrated at this hospitable homestead; the several daughters were given their final send-off therefrom in elegant style.  The whole countryside came upon invitation and enjoyed a grand holiday; the bride was in ecstasy and the bridegroom in clover.  There was enough of the best to eat, and to spare, and the visiting and feasting continued all day and into the wee small hours of the night.  Such was the old fashioned wedding.  The bridal couple did not slip away from their friends immedi ately after the ceremony--invariably performed in church--, but shed their luster on the assemblage to the very end.  There was no hurried departure on a wedding-trip, hence no waste of rice, nor of old shoes, which latter were either taken to the shoe-surgeon to be patched or saved for fuel.  Almost invariably the happy couple settled down promptly in a nest of their own and began at once to plan, work and save for days to come.  Often on the marriage night the newly-weds were serenaded by a charivari crowd made up of acquaintances who had not been included at the nuptial feast.  Their advent was heralded by a prodigious racket and a demand f or smokes and for toothsome left-over morsels, the more the better.  They were out for a lark and as a rule were tractable, though noisy.

Endre was good at word-pictures and could relate graphically his many a nd varied experiences.  Often have we listened with keenest interest to h is narratives, but they have mostly, to our regret, escaped from memory.  We will, however, in closing, submit an added sketch from his life tou ching the Indian uprisings in connection with the Spirit Lake Massacre.

On a Sunday afternoon in the long ago, as our friend was reading a religious discourse before his assembled household, his aged mother suddenly inte rrupted him with the explanation:  "Look at all the cattle!"  But her vision was at fault and instead of cattle three files of Redskins advanci ng in regulation Indian fashion were approaching, the center file heading straight for the house.  A few braves mounted on ponies rode back and f orth between the lines to communicate orders.  Our friends grew alarmed an d, hoping to escape the oncoming hordes, hurriedly left in the directi on of Store Per's place to the south, Endre grabbing one child and his wif e's brother, a soldier, the other.  Mr. Keefe, who occupied the place lat er owned by Rasmus Eie, met them on the way and bade them be of good cheer as he did not think the warriors would molest them while on the march.  They kept filing by at intervals till sundown, when we may presume th ey made camp.  The narrator said it was an unforgettable sight as he view ed the multi-colored pageant of the prairie winding in and out among the h ills as far as the eye could reach.  He judged there were thousands of t he paint-bedaubed, feather-bedecked braves in the vast company.  A few bel ated youthful stragglers brought up the rear and were crying.  It seemed s trange to Mr. Keefe that an Indian warrior should so forget himself as to shed tears, and so sought to learn the reason.  But no word was v ouchsafed him.  Evidently the rigors of the warpath had been too much f or them and they were downcast because they were likely to miss the antici pated fray.

A friend of Endre was one of the unfortunate victims of the Spirit Lake tragedy.  The family had been warned of the impending danger, but had tarri ed on in their home, disliking to leave.  The consequences were that wh en the warring hordes came upon them there was bloodshed, the husband w as killed near their dwelling, while the wife was seized and stripped a nd forced to witness the slaughter of her baby.  She expected to meet a similar fate, but fortunately found an opportunity to hide in the tall grass and thus escaped.

End (Transcribed July 2007 by Phil Rhodes with minor editing.)

More About ANDREW (ENDRE) CHRISTIANSON:
Burial: Mamrelund Cemetery, Iowa
Census: 1880, Scott Township, Hamilton County, Iowa
Emigration: 1852, Schooner "Rogaland" departed Stavanger April 21, 1852.
Immigration: 1852, Schooner "Rogaland" arrived New York June 10, 1852.

More About JULIA NELSON:
Burial: 1912, Mamrelund Cemetery, Hamilton County, IA
Census: 1900, Scott Township, Hamilton County, Iowa
   
Children of ANDREW CHRISTIANSON and JULIA NELSON are:
    i.    SOPHIA7 CHRISTIANSON, b. Abt. 1861, Iowa.
    ii.    MARY CHRISTIANSON, b. 1865, Iowa; d. 1950; m. BENDICK ANDREAS ANDERSON; b. 29 Apr 1879, Tjernagel Nordre Farm, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway; d. 1968, Story City, Iowa.

More About MARY CHRISTIANSON:
Burial: 1950, Mamrelund Cemetery, Hamilton County, IA

More About BENDICK ANDREAS ANDERSON:
Burial: Mamrelund Cemetery, rural Story City, Iowa

    iii.    CHRISTINA CHRISTIANSON, b. Abt. 1869, Iowa.
    iv.    HELEN CHRISTIANSON, b. Abt. 1871, Iowa.
    v.    PETER CHRISTIANSON, b. Abt. 1875, Iowa.
    vi.    ANDREW JULIUS CHRISTIANSON, b. Abt. Oct 1878, Iowa; d. 19 Jul 1879, Iowa.

More About ANDREW JULIUS CHRISTIANSON:
Burial: 1879, Mamrelund Cemetery, Hamilton County, IA

    vii.    ANDREW J CHRISTIANSON, b. Abt. 1883, Iowa.


10.  CHRISTIAN CHRISTIANSON6 LOGAN (CHRISTEN5 PEDERSON, PEDER4 ANDERSSON, ANDERS3 HALVARDSON, HALVARD2 ANDERSSON, ANDERS1 HANSSON) was born 19 Apr 1841 in Tjernagel, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway, and died 11 Oct 1926 in Story County, IA.  He married (1) BRITA EVELINE KNUTSDATTER 24 Jul 1864 in Sveio, Hordaland, Norway.  She was born 16 May 1842 in Lier, Vestre, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway, and died 17 Jan 1883 in Scott Twp, Hamilton County, IA.  He married (2) JULIA OSTREN 10 Nov 1883.  She died 17 Sep 1885.  He married (3) JULIA DUEA BOYD 15 Mar 1888 in Roland, Story County, IA.  She was born Aug 1853 in Grundy County, IL.

Notes for CHRISTIAN CHRISTIANSON LOGAN:
NOTE ON SURNAME:  Changed surname from Christianson to Logan in the 1870s for reasons unknown.

CIVIL WAR RECORD:
Vesterheim Museum Database "Norwegians in the Civil War":

CHRISTIANSON, Christian
IL 36th Inf Co F. Residence: Newark, Kendall County, Illinois. Born in N or way.
Civil War: Sailor. Age 21. Unmarried. Gray eyes, light hair, fair complexion,
5'5". Enlisted for three years on 17 Aug 1861 at Northville, Illinois. Mustered
20 Aug 1861 at Aurora, Illinois. Private. Discharged from the service for disability, due to diarrhea, in Feb 1862 at Rolla, Missouri. Sources: ( ILSA reel
3 p 72)

BIOGRAPHY:
Transcription of entry on page 375 of "Biographical Record and Portra it Al bum of Webster and Hamilton Counties, Iowa", The Lewis Publishing Co mpany, Chicago, 1888.

CHRISTIAN LOGAN, section 33, Scott Township, is a native of Norway, born April 19, 1841.  When he was seven years old his father, Christian Peterson, died, and when he was sixteen his mother, Mary Peterson, came to America with her three youngest children, Mr. Logan being the eldest of the three.  The six eldest of the family had preceded the mother to America.  Of the family five sons and two daughters are living.  Of these Anders, Andrew, Christian, Melinda, wife of Canute Phillops, and Bertha, wi fe of Nute Nelson, live in Hamilton County; Peter, the eldest of the family, lives in LaSalle County, Illinois, and John lives in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.  Helen and Henry are deceased.  The mother lives with her son Andrew.  In 1861 our subject enlisted in the defense of his adopted country in Company F, Thirty-sixth Illinois Infantry, but about seven months af ter his enlistment was discharged at St. Louis, Missouri, on account of ill-health.  Being unable to work on the farm he went to Chicago and attended the Lutheran seminary about four months.  In the spring of 1863 he came to Hamilton County and made his home with his sister, Mrs. Phillops, and January 28, 1864, started for Norway, returning the following July accompanied by a wife he had married in his native country, whose maiden na me was Bertha Evalina Knudson.  She died January 17, 1883, leaving five ch ildren - Henry, Gertrude, Nute, Helen and Caroline.  One, Ann, died in infancy.  November 10, 1883, Mr. Logan married Julia Ostren, who died September 17, 1885, leaving one son - Ela Benjamin.  His present wife was Mrs. Julia Boyd, who was born in Grundy County, Illinois, in August, 1853.  She has three children by her first marriage - Otis, Martha a nd Joseph, and has lost one, Rachel, who died aged seven years.  Mr. Logan has 160 acres in his homestead, and also owns 147 acres in Story Count y, adjoining.  No improvements had been made when he settled on his land, and from a wild prairie he has made a beautiful farm, with especial ly good building improvements, surrounded by fine groves of forest trees.  In politics he is a Republican, and is a member of the Lutheran church .

CHRISTIAN LOGAN biography by Nehemias Tjernagel.

Christian Logan, one of a meager handful of early pioneer survivors, relat es that he left Tjernagel, Norway, to embark for America’s prosperous shor es in April 1857.  His mother and two sisters, Bertha, later Mrs. Knute Nelson Solbjor, and Helen, later Mrs. Haaver Thorson, accompanied him.  They sailed from Bergen on the ship Haakon Adelsten, and were seven weeks on the voyage to Quebec.

On these early sailing ships it was usually the custom among the passenge rs to take provisions of their own in sufficient quantity to last them thr oughout the voyage.  There were stoves on board, but as these were f ew in proportion to the passengers, there was usually much rivalry when a ll were intent on preparing their meals at the same time.  However, duri ng stormy weather the competition was less keen; to many the mere aro ma of food was unbearable.  I recall that our good neighbor Haakon Ingebrigtson spoke of having been laid low by seasickness the entire voyage, and no proposal could ever be made attractive enough to induce him to ma ke a return trip.  A malady worse to endure, being, so to speak, self-inflicted, can scarcely be imagined.  The ocean is merciless and makes no apol ogies; it asks no one to ride its heaving back and those who do must take the natural consequences.

Within a week of their arrival at Quebec our friends continued their journ ey, Ottawa, Illinois, being their destination.  Having for many days hea rd no word they could understand, imagine their joy at being hailed by a w ell-known voice in their own vernacular upon leaving the train at the above-named place.  It was that of their cousin, Helga Phillops, who was working by the week in the city and had snatched the opportunity to hasten over to the depot to meet them.  To the reader the incident may seem trivia l, but to the immigrants newly landed in a strange world it was an event.  Their good angel earned fresh laurels by hiring Mr. Osten Heier to take them in his wagon to their folks in the country.  Helga later married Ole Jackson Dalager.  They were blessed with six children.

The newcomers found welcome in the home of Mr. Logan’s brother, Peder Christenson, who had been the first of his family to come to America and had settled on a farm near Norway, Illinois, some years earlier.  Christian took the name Logan upon his later entrance into the army.  He was employed on his brother’s farm the first summer, and the next year was install ed as hired man on a place near Marseilles, Illinois, owned by a Yankee.  He was paid thirteen dollars a month, and earned it.  His boss roust ed him from bed in the morning before sun rise.  If breakfast was not qui te ready after the morning chores were done, an axe was pressed into his hands with instructions to wield it diligently till he was called.  Befo re the last mouthful was swallowed he was rushed from the table to hurry t hrough more work; and so it went day after day, week after week, early a nd late.  However, during harvest he had the satisfaction of seeing his ta skmaster slack up a little, though unwillingly.  There was a considerab le acreage of grain and in reaping he drove his horses with fierce energy and vigor.  Meantime our friend was to bind the grain.  To keep up single-handed was a physical impossibility, but when all the grain was down t he boss himself took a hand.  He rushed in as if to do it all in one sweep, but Logan said to himself:  wait!  The aggressive one works at top spe ed to spur the other on, but all the latter exerted himself to do was to keep the pace set by the former.  After two or three rounds about the fie ld the impetuous hustler realized he had inaugurated a speed-rate whi ch he himself was unable to hold; but Logan held it and enjoyed seeing the desperate but futile efforts of the other to avoid falling behind.  Wh en the dinner bell rang, the taskmaster dropped his bundle like a hot iron, being utterly spent, and on reaching the threshold of his home suddenly collapsed, falling face forward on the ground.

Later Logan was sent away to help the ambitious Yankee’s brother, who h ad a large field of grain recently cut but unbound.  He found the owner ’s three strapping sons on hand preparing the task, and with his assistan ce they set to work at a furious rate.  They strove so strenuously that Logan doubted if he could hold out and thought seriously of emulating the ground squirrels and disappearing in some hole.  However, he decided to p ut a little more steel into his muscles and endeavor to hang on.  After ma king a few rounds in the cyclonic fashion there was a noticeable slackening among the speeders, and very soon the new comer found himself considerably in the lead.  Late on the hurry-up trio of strapping sons became so limp and undone that they could scarcely move, and Logan was left to keep his gait until evening, and even then had strength enough for an addition al spurt if need be.

In 1859 our friend hired out for the year for one hundred and thirty dollars.  He liked his boss, but not his lady.  She used to watch him from t he window to see if he was working, and if her husband happened to be aw ay she served the hungry youth a mid-day meal consisting of sour milk, hard old bread, and tooth-proof chunks of dried meat.  During corn husking s he was a veritable fury of aggressiveness and demanded of the help that th ey show up at cock-crow in the morning.  The trusty chanticleer did his part more than promptly, at which the help bounced out of bed, and when t he hired girl announced breakfast and the sleepy host entered the room t he clock struck three!  A rumpus followed.  The big man thundered out an o rder that all return immediately to bed, and hustled his thrifty spouse ba ck to their room where she was clearly reminded what was what.

The boss usually had good self-control, but sometimes lost it.  Once an in quisitive pig possessing a formidable snout let himself out, and nosing ab out had got himself out, and on the prongs of an overturned harrow, with d eath as his portion.  The other hogs followed his lead, made for the harr ow as if intent on a similar fate, and the owner, exasperated at being unable to drive them back, left them to their doom saying:  “Kill yourself then, if that is what you want!”  He was apparently even somewhat incensed at Christian for trying to hinder them from getting into the death-trap .

That same year Mr. Logan and my father took a trip to Iowa to buy land.  T hey had saved their earnings and were able to pay cash for small land purc hases.  They journeyed by train from Ottawa to Rock Island, crossed the Mi ssissippi by ferry-boat to Davenport, and continued by train to Iowa Cit y, which, at that time, was the western terminal of the railroad.  After this they went afoot, took occasional meals at inns, and slept in haystac ks at night.  To them it was a genuine lark, for they suffered no real hardship, the energy of youth combining with promising hopes for the future g iving zest to the spirit and buoyancy to the step.  They must have walk ed quite rapidly, for they covered the distance from Marshalltown to Marie tta and on to Nevada in one day.  They put up at a hotel just south of t he court-house, noting presently that other houses were few, none being seen north of the creek.  The next day saw them passing the Hegland place ne ar Roland, where they met for the first time Michael Hegland, one of the s ons in that family.  He treated them to a drink of water drawn by an old fashioned chain-pump from a well dug in the hillside.  For this refreshing drink and the kindly manner of the man at the pump they have ever held him in grateful remembrance.  One remembers the smallest favor when the heart goes with it.

Towards evening they reached their destination, the present Phillops homes tead, then occupied by Peder Larson, cousin to the one and brother to t he other.  He had located here a year earlier, broken some prairie land, a nd upon their arrival was found busy in a tiny corn-field picking corn in to a grain-sack.  He had accumulated some livestock and recently put up considerable hay, which was his for the making.  The vast grass-covered expanse around him provided him with free pasturage as well as winter rougha ge for his cattle.  No one objected, not even the Indians.  Evidently, th ey thought that if a man was so anxious for work as to put up hay and care for stock, he deserved not only freedom from interference, but their sympathy as well.

After buying land (my father paid four dollars per acre for a certain tract included in the present home farm) the doughty pedestrians returned to Illinois.  Here they remained for a few years before locating permanently on their farmsteads in Iowa.

In 1860 Logan hired out to Nels Nelson Haugen who, with his wife, had been passengers on the “Restauration”, a sloop that brought the first large party of Norwegian immigrants to these shores in 1825.  The voyage lasted a little over three months and after various vicissitudes they good ship finally landed at New York October 9, that year.  They first settled at Rochester, New York, but moved to Illinois a few years later.

Though Logan was well treated by the family, Nels had a habit of teasing him, as the following incident illustrates:  In the early days the reape rs were not equipped with self-rakes and a man was stationed at the re ar of the platform armed with a long-handled, three-tined fork, and as the grain fell before the sickle it was his job to work it off in amounts suitable for bundles.  When Nels came to places where the grain stood exceptionally thick he urged his horses on at top speed, ostensibly to hurry through, but in reality to test the skill and endurance of his workman.  Chr istian hated to give up and plied his fork with dogged perseverance; and he managed to keep the platform clear, though the effort threatened to disrupt his vitals.

In December of the same year Logan went to Milwaukee, where he was made welcome in the home of his brother Jokum Christenson, the ship-owner.  Duri ng winter he went to common school in the company of Jokum’s children.  The ensuing summer he was engaged as cook on one of his brother’s lake vessels.  He took the raillery and gaff directed at him by his fun-loving ship mates with the calm philosophy of one who knows his place and the traditions of his trade.  However, if aroused, his deep voice rumbled forth sati re and sarcasm so withering as to annihilate his tormenters then and there.  During spare moments ashore he studied grammar under the tutelage of Jokum’s pastor, Hatlestad by name.

In August, 1861, upon coming back to Illinois, he found city and country a ll aflame with war excitement.  Young and old were enlisting, and when the fever was at its height Logan, too, joined as a volunteer.  His immediate companions were Canute Phillops, Borge Thompson, Even Haugen and John Hetletvedt.  They promised each other not to drink, swear, or play cards when in camp or action; but the temptations besetting them in the army we re many, and not all remained entirely true to their promise.  Logan speaks of Peter Phillops as being an exceptionally fine character.  He died while in the service.  Canute served gallantly through the entire war, experiencing for a period, the horrors of a rebel prison.

Leaving Aurora on October, 1861, the enlisted men came to Quincy, where th ey embarked on a steamer bound for St. Louis.  On the way Logan fell sick and lay on deck helpless.  There were 1200 soldiers on board, with much confusion and heavy tramping of feet, so that the sick man was jostled and otherwise disturbed by his good natured but careless mates.  Our friend found that during such experiences yearning for home and mother is far, far beyond the medium of words to convey.  At St. Louis he was placed in an open box-car and transported with the other soldiers to a town 150 miles further south.  He continued ill in camp for several weeks, and t here was but scant hope of his recovery.  He remembers that at one time so me one shouted enquiringly through the tent door, “Is he dead?”  “No, not yet”, was the answer of Porter Olson, a comrade, who was concerned for him and aided more than any other in getting him on his feet.  Olson eventually rose to eminence in the army, but was finally killed in battle.

In January, 1862, orders were received to march to Lebanon, North Carolina, where they encountered General Lee with his ten thousand.  The first Norwegian-American who fell here was Paul Fagerland, color-bearer.  Being un well, Logan and John Hetletvedt were soon ordered to the hospital.  Somewhat recovered, the former endeavored to rejoin his company, but sank weak a nd spent under the burden of his accoutrements. Owing to their frail physical condition they were both given their discharge from the army in February, 1862, and were returned home the same month.  Logan did not fully recover his strength for several years.

After farming for a season he sold out and went to Chicago, where he enrol led as a student in Augustana Seminary.  He remained there until the spri ng of 1863, when he went to Iowa to resume farming.  In January of the next year he took a trip to Norway, where he received a “promise true” from the girl of his choice, Bertha Eveline Lier, to whom upon his return he was married July 24, 1864, the Rev. Nils Amlund officiating.  They established the well-known Logan homestead in Scott Township, Hamilton County, four and one half miles northeast of Story City.  The union was blessed with six children of whom five are still living.  The wife died in 1883, and he found another helpmate in he person of Anna Gurine Ostrem, who departed this life in the second year of their marriage, leaving a two-mont hs-old son who soon died.  In 1888 the twice bereaved husband wedded the widow Mrs. Julia Boyd, the faithful companion of his ?ing years.  This union was blessed with five children.  These, together with the elder Logan children and his wife’s three children from her former marriage, combined to make a large family.  A daughter of his deceased sister Helen, was also adopted into the family.  In the year 1915 the Logans moved to Roland, Iowa.

In his duties as home-maker, church-supporter and citizen Logan evinced a hearty interest.  In looking back upon his life he realized that the Lord has been nigh, and that His ways are very wonderful, yea, past finding out.  The Word of God held a place of honor in his home.

(Transcribed by Phil Rhodes, 28 June 2007, from Nehemias Tjernagel’s “Passing of the Prairie” manuscript.  Manuscript copy kindly provided by Peter Tjernagel Harstad.  I attempted to retain Nehemias’ grammar, spelling and punctuation except in few cases of obvious typographical error.)

More About CHRISTIAN CHRISTIANSON LOGAN:
Burial: 1926, Roland Cemetery, Story County, IA
Census: 1870, Scott Township, Hamilton County, Iowa
Emigration: 1857, Bergen, Norway on vessel "Haakon Adelsten".
Immigration: 1857, Quebec, Canada on vessel "Haakon Adelsten".
Military service: Bet. 1861 - 1962, Civil War

More About BRITA EVELINE KNUTSDATTER:
Census: 1870, Scott Township, Hamilton County, Iowa
   
Children of CHRISTIAN LOGAN and BRITA KNUTSDATTER are:
    i.    HENRY A.7 LOGAN, b. 24 Dec 1865, Scott Twp, Hamilton County, IA.
30.    ii.    MARY GERTRUDE LOGAN, b. Feb 1869, Scott Twp, Hamilton County, IA.
31.    iii.    KNUTE (KNUT) LOGAN, b. 04 Oct 1870, Scott Twp, Hamilton County, IA.
32.    iv.    HELEN BERDINE (DINA) LOGAN, b. 27 May 1873, Scott Twp, Hamilton County, IA; d. 14 Jul 1958, Mason City, Cerro Gordo County, IA.
    v.    ANNA CAROLINE LOGAN, b. 23 Jan 1876, Scott Twp, Hamilton County, IA.

   
Child of CHRISTIAN LOGAN and JULIA OSTREN is:
    vi.    ELA BENJAMIN7 LOGAN, b. 20 Nov 1884; d. 07 Oct 1889.

   
Children of CHRISTIAN LOGAN and JULIA BOYD are:
    vii.    EVALINE7 LOGAN, b. Abt. 1891, Scott Twp, Hamilton County, IA; d. Feb 1951, Radcliffe, IA; m. CARL TESDAHL.
    viii.    CLARA JANET LOGAN, b. 26 Oct 1892, Scott Twp, Hamilton County, IA.
    ix.    PALMER ELISA LOGAN, b. 21 Sep 1894, Scott Twp, Hamilton County, IA.
    x.    NOAH (NOEL) LOGAN, b. Abt. 1901, Scott Twp, Hamilton County, IA; d. 01 May 1954, Omaha, NE.

Notes for NOAH (NOEL) LOGAN:
Obituary from Council Bluffs (Iowa) Nonpareil, Sunday, 2 May 1954:

County coroner Henry Meyer said Saturday he has not decided whether to hold an inquest into the death of Dr. Noel J. Logan of Omaha, who died about noon at a local hospital.

He was injured in a two-car collision Thursday night on Highway 30-75 near Crescent.  Dr. Logan was the seventh traffic fatality for 1954 in Pottawattamie County (Iowa).

Dr. Logan was an instructor at Dana College of Blair, Neb., and head of the Logan school of Music at Omaha.

A native of Roland, Iowa, Dr. Logan was dean of music for 12 years at Dubuque University and organized the nationally known Dubuque a capella choir.

Dr. Logan is survived by:  Widow, Mabel; daughter, Mrsa. Marilee Amundson of Omaha: son J. Edward of Manassas, Va; two sisters, Mrs. Clara Mehus and Mrs. Evelyn Tesdahl. both of Roland; brother Palmer Logan, also of Roland.

The body is at Sholin-Hellmen Funeral Home in Omaha.  Funeral arrangements are pending.


11.  BERTHA MARIE6 CHRISTIANSON (CHRISTEN5 PEDERSON, PEDER4 ANDERSSON, ANDERS3 HALVARDSON, HALVARD2 ANDERSSON, ANDERS1 HANSSON) was born 26 Apr 1844 in Hordaland, Norway, and died 1933 in Iowa.  She married CANUTE C NELSON, son of JONAS NELSON and SOPHIA HETLETVEDT.  He was born 27 Mar 1844 in LaSalle County, IL.

More About BERTHA MARIE CHRISTIANSON:
Burial: Mamrelund Cemetery, Iowa
Census: 1860, Story City, Norway Twp, Hamilton County, IA
Christening: 28 Apr 1844, Tjernagel, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway

Notes for CANUTE C NELSON:
CANUTE C. NELSON

Canute C. Nelson, who is now practically living a retired life in Hamilton county, was born in La Salle county, Illinois, March 27, 1844. His parents were Jonas and Sophie (Olson) Nelson, both of whom were natives of Sweden, and after the death of her first husband the mother married John S. John­son, a native of Norway, who emigrated to Illinois about 1842, when Chicago was a mere village, and he became one of the pioneer settlers of La Salle county.  Mrs. Johnson was only about ten years of age when she became a native of that county.  She was born in 1822 and died in the year 1896, at the age of seventy-four years. Mr. Johnson was a farmer by occupation and acquired a competence in Illinois, owning three hundred acres of well improved land in La Salle county.  He remained there until the close of the Civil war, when in 1865 he removed to Benton county, Iowa, and continued farming, being a prosperous agriculturi st of that locality.  He added to his landed possessions there until he had twelve hundred acres and he remained in that county until his death.  He left a widow and was also survived by six children, while seven of the family were deceased. Julia, the eldest, is the wife of Andrew Christianson, of Hamilton county; Canute C. is the next younger; Josie is the wife of M. L. Henderson, of Randall; Martin is the fourth of the family; Sarah is Mrs. Chernagal, of Story City, Iowa; and Delia is Mrs. Hilberd, of Benton county.

Mr. Nelson of this review received a common school education, although his privileges were somewhat limited. He has gathered through reading, expe rience and observation, however, a broad fund of knowledge and always keeps abreast of the times. In April, 1862, at the age of eighteen years, he enlisted in Company G., One Hundred and Fourth Illinois Infantry, under Colonel Moore and Captain White, and his command was attached to the First Division Army Corps.  He participated in many important battles, including that of Chickamauga. The regiment left La Salle county with one thousand men and returned home with only one hundred and fifty. Mr. Nelson was taken prisoner at Hartsville, Tennessee, and on one occasion he sustained a flesh wound. He went with Sherman on his celebrated march to the sea and participated in the battles of Nashville, Frankfort, Louisville, and many skirmishes, being honorably discharged in Washington, D.C., in 1864. At the close of his military service Mr. Nelson returned to La Salle co unty, Illinois, and assisted his stepfather upon the home farm until the removal of the family to Benton county., Iowa. He cont inued to work on Mr. Johnson's farm for a time, then started out in life for himself, settling in Hamilton county in 1865. He worked out by the day in Scott township, breaking the prairie, and there remained for a year.

As a companion and helpmeet for life's journey he chose Bertha Christianson, who was born in Norway, April 27, 1844, and was about twelve years of age when. she came to America. She has three brothers. Her father died in 1848 and her mother passed away in 1897. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Nelson were bo rn eight children:  Carl, born September 3, 1866; Jonas, born May 9, 1868; Mary, born September 10, 1870; Henry, who was born July 4, 1874, and di ed on the 6th of October of the same year; Frank, born Decemb er 26, 1875, John, born March 27, 1878; Ellen, who was born March 29, 1882, and di ed an the 16th of May of that year; and Henry, born June 22, 1883.

When Mr. Nelson located in this county upon a farm of his own he settled on section 14, Ellsworth township. He has eighty acres of land here and to a greater or less extent has been dealing in land, but at the present time he is practically retired from business, having accumulated a capital sufficient to enable him to put aside the more active duti es of life. He has served as justice of the peace in Ellsworth township for seven y ears, his decisions being strictly fair and impartial. He was also school director for a number of years and the cause of education found in h im a warm friend.   He has been a delegate to county conventions of the Republican party and has never wavered in his allegiance to th at party. He belongs to the Grand Army of the Republic and thus maintains pleasant relat ions with his old army comrades who wore the blue with him upon southern battle-fields.

Source:  A BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD OF HAMILTON COUNTY, IOWA, S. J. Clarke Pu bl ishing Company, New York and Chicago, 1902, pages 593-594.
   
Children of BERTHA CHRISTIANSON and CANUTE NELSON are:
    i.    CARL7 NELSON, b. 03 Sep 1866, Hamilton Co, IA; m. MAY MITCHELL, 23 Apr 1894, Washington, DC.

Notes for CARL NELSON:
Professor Carl Nelson was born September 3, 1866, and is a musician of n ational reputation. He began his musical studies in Jewell under the direction of Professor Peterson, who afterward opened a conservatory of music in Sioux City. When Professor Nelson completed his course he went up on the road and has been connected with the world of music for seventeen y ears, devoting his life to the work. He is a musician of superior ability, having played engagements with such noted representa­tives of the art as Luciano, Kenturno and his son, Dr. George Kenturno, also with Gilmore, of New York, and with John Philip Sousa. Professor Nelson resided in New York for fourteen years and for four years was upon the road, traveling mostly through the eastern states. He served for one year as leader of the band in a circus. He played engagements with the famous band of Armand Putz, in the season of 1894-5, at Sea Beach, Coney Island, also at Brighton Pier and at Paul Boynton chutes at Coney Island in the season of 1896. He engaged in teaching clarionet music in the New Jersey Institute of Music and is now giving lessons on the cornet, violin and all brass instruments, in Jewell. He is at the present time director of the Jewell band and is one of the best musicians in the state of Iowa. He re­turned to this city on account of his wife's health and Jewell should feel highly honored that she has such a competent and famous musician in her midst.  He was married April 23, 1894, in Washington, D. C ., to Miss May Mitchell, daughter of Thomas A. and Isabelle (Mayo) Mitchell, the former of Washington, D.C. and the latter of Annapolis, Maryland.  Mrs. Nelson is a lady of culture and refinement and the Professor and his wife are prominent socially as well as in musical circles.

Source:  A BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD OF HAMILTON COUNTY, IOWA, S. J. Clarke Pu bl ishing Company, New York and Chicago, 1902, pages 594-595.

More About CARL NELSON:
Occupation: Musician

    ii.    JONAS NELSON, b. 09 May 1868, Hamilton Co, IA.
    iii.    MARY NELSON, b. 10 Sep 1870, Hamilton Co, IA.
    iv.    HENRY NELSON, b. 04 Jul 1874, Hamilton Co, IA; d. 06 Oct 1874, Hamilton Co, IA.
    v.    FRANK NELSON, b. 26 Dec 1875, Hamilton Co, IA.
    vi.    JOHN NELSON, b. 27 Mar 1878, Hamilton Co, IA.
    vii.    ELLEN NELSON, b. 29 Mar 1882, Hamilton Co, IA; d. 16 May 1882, Hamilton Co, IA.
    viii.    HENRY NELSON, b. 22 Jun 1883, Hamilton Co, IA.


12.  ELLEN KRISTINE6 CHRISTIANSON (CHRISTEN5 PEDERSON, PEDER4 ANDERSSON, ANDERS3 HALVARDSON, HALVARD2 ANDERSSON, ANDERS1 HANSSON) was born 21 Feb 1847 in Tjernagel, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway, and died 19 Mar 1882.  She married HAAVER THORSEN 01 Jan 1873 in Milwaukee County, WI.  He was born Abt. 1845 in Norway.

More About ELLEN KRISTINE CHRISTIANSON:
Burial: Mamrelund Cemetery, Hamilton County, Iowa
   
Children of ELLEN CHRISTIANSON and HAAVER THORSEN are:
    i.    HELENA7 THORSEN, b. Abt. 1874, Wisconsin.
33.    ii.    MARY THORSEN, b. 25 Dec 1875, Wisconsin; d. 17 Jan 1977, Duluth, Saint Louis County, MN.
    iii.    CAROLINA THORSEN, b. Abt. 1877, Wisconsin.
    iv.    THORA THORSEN, b. Abt. 1879, Wisconsin.


13.  ANNA MARIE6 PHILLIPSDATTER (KRISTI5 PEDERSDATTER, PEDER4 ANDERSSON, ANDERS3 HALVARDSON, HALVARD2 ANDERSSON, ANDERS1 HANSSON) was born 1830 in Sveio, Hordaland, Norway, and died 12 Aug 1852 in Wisconsin.  She married MIKKEL JOHANNESSEN 10 Apr 1849 in Finnås Parish, Hordaland, Norway, son of JOHANNES MIKKELSEN and DORDI LARSDATTER.  He was born 1825 in Finnas, Hordaland, Norway, and died in USA.

More About ANNA MARIE PHILLIPSDATTER:
Christening: 21 Mar 1830, Finnas, Hordaland, Norway
Emigration: 1850, Bergen, Norway on bark "Therese".
Immigration: 28 Aug 1850, New York on bark "Therese".

More About MIKKEL JOHANNESSEN:
Emigration: 1850, Bergen, Norway on bark "Therese".
Immigration: 28 Aug 1850, New York on bark "Therese".
   
Children of ANNA PHILLIPSDATTER and MIKKEL JOHANNESSEN are:
34.    i.    DOROTHY SEVERINE (HELENE)7 JOHANNESSEN, b. 10 May 1849, Finnas, Hordaland, Norway; d. 01 Dec 1929.
35.    ii.    JULIA CHERSTINE (KRISTI) JOHANNESSEN, b. 23 Dec 1850, Wisconsin; d. 04 Apr 1920, Story County, IA.


14.  HELGA (HELEN PHILLOPS)6 PHILLIPSDATTER (KRISTI5 PEDERSDATTER, PEDER4 ANDERSSON, ANDERS3 HALVARDSON, HALVARD2 ANDERSSON, ANDERS1 HANSSON) was born 19 Jul 1832 in Sveio, Hordaland, Norway, and died 27 Oct 1909 in Seneca, IL.  She married (1) OLE JACKSON 17 Jan 1858 in La Salle County, IL.  He was born 11 Oct 1821 in Norway, and died 11 Apr 1877 in Illinois.  She married (2) JACOB HELLAND 11 Nov 1880 in La Salle County, IL. 

More About HELGA (HELEN PHILLOPS) PHILLIPSDATTER:
Emigration: 1850, Bergen on bark "Therese".
Immigration: 28 Aug 1850, New York on bark "Therese".
   
Children of HELGA PHILLIPSDATTER and OLE JACKSON are:
36.    i.    CYRUS7 JACKSON, b. 05 Dec 1858, La Salle County, IL; d. 13 Sep 1947, La Salle County, IL.
37.    ii.    FRANKLIN JACKSON, b. 26 Dec 1861, La Salle County, IL; d. 18 Mar 1947, Shawnee, Oklahoma.
38.    iii.    ALBERT JACKSON, b. 26 Oct 1863, La Salle County, IL.
39.    iv.    EMMA KRISTINE JACKSON, b. 21 Feb 1866, La Salle County, IL.
40.    v.    ANNA JOSEPHINE JACKSON, b. 26 Jul 1868, La Salle County, IL.
41.    vi.    HELENE MARIA JACKSON, b. 02 Jul 1871, La Salle County, IL.
    vii.    LILLY OVIDIA JACKSON, b. 09 Apr 1873, La Salle County, IL; m. ORRIE L MOSSMAN, 22 Dec 1897, La Salle County, IL.


15.  CANUTE (KNUT PHILLIPS)6 PHILLOPS (KRISTI5 PEDERSDATTER, PEDER4 ANDERSSON, ANDERS3 HALVARDSON, HALVARD2 ANDERSSON, ANDERS1 HANSSON) was born 12 Sep 1834 in Sveio, Hordaland, Norway, and died 02 Apr 1906 in Iowa.  He married MALINDA (MALENE OR MALENA) CHRISTIANSON 09 Jul 1865 in Story County, Iowa, daughter of CHRISTEN PEDERSON and BRITA JOKUMSDATTER.  She was born 12 May 1827 in Sveio, Hordaland, Norway, and died 10 Jul 1896 in Iowa.

Notes for CANUTE (KNUT PHILLIPS) PHILLOPS:
BIOGRAPHY:
Transcription of entry on page 371 of "Biographical Record and Portrait Album of Webster and Hamilton Counties, Iowa", The Lewis Publishing Company, Chicago, 1888.

CANUTE PHILLOPS, section 33, Scott Township, was born in Bergen, Norway, S eptember 12, 1834, a son of Canute and Sistena Phillops.  When he was sixteen years old his parents came to the United States, landing in N ew York after a voyage of ten weeks and three days.  They went direct to Dane County, Wisconsin, but a year later moved to LaSalle County, Illinois, and bought a house and lot, and also some cattle, which the father cared for while the sons worked on farms by the month.  The parents h ad a family of four children - Anna M., Helen, Canute and Peter.  In August, 1861, the sons enlisted in Company F, Thirty-sixth Illinois Infantry, and Peter died in the hospital at Murfreesboro in February, 1864.   Canute was with his regiment in the battles of Pea Ridge, Perryville and Stone River, and at the latter place was taken prisoner, but was paroled and sent to Annapolis, Maryland, where he was on provost duty until June, 1863.  He joined his regiment just before the battle at Mission Ridge and took part in that contest.  At the battle of Adairsville he received a gun-shot wound in his thigh, and was in hospitals at Nashville, Loui sville, Madison, Indiana, and at Camp Butler, Springfield, Illinois.  He was discharged on the expiration of his term of servce in September, 1864, and returned to La Salle County.  A few weeks later he came to Hamilton County, Iowa, and set tled in Scott Township, where he engaged in farming.  July 9, 1865, he married Mrs. Melinda (Christianson) Larson, who owned at that time a farm of eighty acres, partly improved.  This land Mr. Phillops has improved and has added to it until the farm now consists of 400 acres of fine land, and the residence and other buildings are among the best in the township.  Their residence was built in 1878 at a cost of $1,800.  Mr. and Mrs. Phillops have one child - Peter M ., born January 18, 1869.  A daughter, Patrie C., is deceased.  Mrs. Phil lops has one daughter by her first marriage, Bertha.  In politics Mr. Phillops is a Republican.  He has serv ed as a township trustee and school tr easurer.  He is a member of t he G. A. R. post in Story City, and he and his wife are members of the Lutheran church.

CIVIL WAR SERVICE:
From entry in Vesterheim Museum database - Norwegians in the Civil War:
Illinois 36th Infantry Company F.
Enlisted 18 August 1861 at Newark, Kendall County, IL.  Described as unm arried, age 27, gray eyes, light hair, fair complexion, 5'8" tall.  Enlisted for three years.  Mustered out 4 October 1864 at Springfield, IL.  ( source Illinois State Archives reel 3, p.72).

Wounded and taken prisoner (source Ulvestad p. 323).

NOTES ON ILLINOIS 36TH INFANTRY:
The THIRTY-SIXTH INFANTRY ILLINOIS VOLUNTEERS was organized at Camp Hammond, near Aurora, Ill., by Colonel N. Greusel, and was mustered into the ser vice by Colonel Brackett, U.S. Mustering Officer, September 23, 186 1, f or a term of three years, or during the war. The Regiment numbered 965 officers and enlisted men, and had two companies of Cavalry, ("A" a nd "B") 186 officers and men. On September 24, moved via Quincy, III ., to St. Loui s, Mo., where the companies of Infantry were armed. Compani es "A" and " B" receiving Minnie and Enfield rifles, the other companies remodeled Spri ngfield muskets caliber 69.

In general engagements alone the Thirty-sixth (Infantry) Regiment lost in killed and wounded over 700 men. It was reinforced by 221 recruits and drafted men. It marched and was transported by rail and boat ov er 10,000 miles during its term of service, Changed commanding officers ten time s, yet it maintained throughout its term of service the esprit de corps of its original organization.

Regimental Commanders included Lieutenant Colonel Porter C. Olson.*

SOURCE:  Illinois Adjutant General's Report, Regimental and Unit Histories, Years 1861-1866.  Illinois State Archives.
*See notes for Porter Olson in this family tree.

MORE ON CANUTE (KNUTE) PHILLIPS (PHILLOPS):
Excerpt of story authored by Peder Gustav Tjernagel, 1931.  Provided courtesy of Mildrid Tjernagel Nickson.

When the Civil War broke out old Kjersteen's boys, Knute and Peter, we re both old enough to go into the service. She had many forbodings, bei ng acquainted with their adventurous nature, fearing they would join t he army. Sure enough at the very first opportunity, Knute enlisted in the 36th Illino is regiment. Just at this time Peter was back in Wisconsin, working in a lumber camp. His mother was hoping against hope that he would receive no information as to the step Knute had take, but not so. He came home quite unexpectedly, and forthwith joined the same regiment. They tried to console their mother by saying, this war won't last long and we will soon be back with you again.

The spinning wheel paused again. Her baby boy, Peter, never came back. Pete fought in seven of the big battles of the Civil War. Among others can be mentioned the battle of Missionary Ridge. (Knute) participated in the battle above the clouds on Lookout Mountain, was wounded but soon got back into action again, was taken prisoner at the battle of Stone River, was sent to Libby Prison where he suffered many tortures before he was liberated.

After the war was over Knute came back home to his parents, in the Fox R iver settlement, Illinois. He was very much grieved on hearing of Peter 's death. Being a man of action, and quick decisions, he made the remark, we go to Iowa as quick as we can get there.

This plan was soon realized for by this time, there were railroad accommodations clear to Nevada, in Story County. Knute soon had his father, mother and his two nieces, Dorothy and Kjersteen, comfortably establi shed on a little farm of his one half mile north of Story City, he himself taking over the management of Madaline's (Peer's widow) farm. Later he married the widow. By his foresight, good management and hard work, he added tract after tract of land to the original eighty, so that at the time of his death he had a well improved farm of four hundred acres, and a very handsome sum of money in the bank.

More About CANUTE (KNUT PHILLIPS) PHILLOPS:
Burial: 1906, Mamrelund Cemetery, Story County, Iowa
Emigration: 1850, Bergen on bark "Therese".
Immigration: 28 Aug 1850, New York on bark "Therese".
Military service: Bet. 1861 - 1864, Civil War - see notes

More About MALINDA (MALENE OR MALENA) CHRISTIANSON:
Burial: Mamrelund Cemetery, Scott Twp, Hamilton County, IA
Census: 1870, Scott Township, Hamilton County, Iowa
Emigration: 1852, Schooner "Rogaland" departed Stavanger April 21, 1852.
Immigration: 1852, Schooner "Rogaland" arrived New York June 10, 1852.
   
Children are listed above under (7) Malinda (Malene or Malena) Christianson.

16.  PEDER (STORE PER)6 LARSON (HELGA5 PEDERSDATTER, PEDER4 ANDERSSON, ANDERS3 HALVARDSON, HALVARD2 ANDERSSON, ANDERS1 HANSSON) was born 12 Feb 1826 in Lien Farm, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway, and died 28 Feb 1863 in Iowa.  He married (1) JOHANNA JOHANNESDATTER, daughter of JOHANNES JOHANNESSEN and RAGNHILD HALDORSDATTER.  She was born 1821 in Sveio, Hordaland, Norway, and died 28 Jun 1884 in Kallevik, Bømlo, Hordaland, Norway.  He married (2) MALINDA (MALENE OR MALENA) CHRISTIANSON 13 Apr 1852 in Sveio Kirke, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway, daughter of CHRISTEN PEDERSON and BRITA JOKUMSDATTER.  She was born 12 May 1827 in Sveio, Hordaland, Norway, and died 10 Jul 1896 in Iowa.

Notes for PEDER (STORE PER) LARSON:
DEATH OF PETER (PEER) LARSON

Excerpt of story authored by Peder Gustav Tjernagel.  Provided courtesy of Mildrid Tjernagel Nickson.

Many things could be told about this interesting and powerful pioneer, but old Kjersteen is waiting for us, down in the Fox River settlemen t. I am very sorry to have to chronicle the following, the saddest part of our story. Peer and Madaline's oldest girl, age seven, was caught in a prairie fire and burned to death. This tragedy was a terrible ha rd blow to the stricken parents, and the good neighbors as well. A nd sadder still, Peer, after the first severe pangs of sorrow had subsided some, wanted to buy something for his remaining girl and his wife. The nearest trading point was Marshalltown, a distance of 45 miles. He h ad no ready cash, but he had one hog. This hog he butchered, loaded same into his wagon and started out for Marshalltown, where he figured on doing some bartering. He came as far as about where the town of Yeering now is situated, when he was suddenly stricken with a severe pain in his abdomen. His otherwise powerful hands let go of the reins, and his spirited horses started to run. But fortunately there were others on the road w ho caught his te am. Seeing his helpless condition, they carried him in to a house nearby, where in spite of all that could be done for him by those good people, he died inside of an hour. He reached the age of thirty-six years. (This took place in the year 1863.)

Peder Gustav Tjernagel, 1931

More About PEDER (STORE PER) LARSON:
Burial: Boe Cemetery, Hamilton County, Iowa
Emigration: 1852, Schooner "Rogaland" departed Stavanger April 21, 1852.
Immigration: 1852, Schooner "Rogaland" arrived New York June 10, 1852.

More About MALINDA (MALENE OR MALENA) CHRISTIANSON:
Burial: Mamrelund Cemetery, Scott Twp, Hamilton County, IA
Census: 1870, Scott Township, Hamilton County, Iowa
Emigration: 1852, Schooner "Rogaland" departed Stavanger April 21, 1852.
Immigration: 1852, Schooner "Rogaland" arrived New York June 10, 1852.
   
Child of PEDER LARSON and JOHANNA JOHANNESDATTER is:
    i.    PEDER7 PEDERSEN, b. 12 Mar 1846, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway; d. Aft. 1865.

More About PEDER PEDERSEN:
Christening: 23 Mar 1846, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway
Confirmation: 08 Sep 1861, Finnås Parish, Hordaland, Norway

   
Children are listed above under (7) Malinda (Malene or Malena) Christianson.

17.  GUNHILDE6 LARSDATTER (HELGA5 PEDERSDATTER, PEDER4 ANDERSSON, ANDERS3 HALVARDSON, HALVARD2 ANDERSSON, ANDERS1 HANSSON) was born Aug 1828 in Lien Farm, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway, and died May 1855 in Tjernagel Nordre Farm, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway.  She married OLE ANDREAS ANDERSSON 1853 in Norway.  He was born 14 Nov 1831 in Asbu, Norway, and died 14 Jan 1885 in Tjernagel Nordre Farm, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway.

Notes for GUNHILDE LARSDATTER:
Finnås burial records indicate Tjernagel as farm name at time of death.
   
Child of GUNHILDE LARSDATTER and OLE ANDERSSON is:
    i.    HELGA MARIE7 ANDERSDATTER, b. 02 May 1855; d. May 1855.


18.  HELEN (HELGA) MARIE6 LARSDATTER (HELGA5 PEDERSDATTER, PEDER4 ANDERSSON, ANDERS3 HALVARDSON, HALVARD2 ANDERSSON, ANDERS1 HANSSON) was born 18 Aug 1830 in Hordaland, Norway, and died 26 Sep 1897 in Iowa.  She married ANDERS CHRISTIANSON 29 Mar 1853 in Hordaland, Norway, son of CHRISTEN PEDERSON and MARI ANDERSDATTER.  He was born 17 Oct 1831 in Tjernagel, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway, and died 17 Sep 1910 in Iowa.

Notes for ANDERS CHRISTIANSON:
BIOGRAPHICAL RECORD AND PORTRAIT ALBUM OF WEBSTER AND HAMILTON COUNTIES,  IOWA
The Lewis Publishing Company, Chicago, 1888, pages 280-281

ANDERS CHRISTIANSON, one of the well-known pioneers pf Scott Township, resides on section 20, where he owns 140 acres, and also owns 240 acres adjoining on section 21, making a fine farm of 380 acres.  His land was new when he settled on it, and he has made all the improvements and now has a beautiful home.  He has a good residence and substantial farm buildi ngs and fine groves of trees, where once was a treeless prairie.  Mr. Christianson was born in Norway, October 17, 1831.  His father, Christian Peterson, died when he was a boy.  He was reared in his native country, and was there married to Helen Larson.  In 1854 he came to America, landing in Quebec, and proceeded direct to La Salle County, Illinois, whe re a brother and sister had already located.  In 1857 he came with his brother-in-law, Peter Larson, to Hamilton County, and they enjoy the honor of being the first settlers of Scott Township.  A sister, Mrs. Phillops, was the first of the family to come to the county.  He worked for others at farm work for some time before buying his land, and also worked a farm in section 3, belonging to Albert Hall, on shares, and in 1864 bought his present farm.  When Mr. Christianson came to Iowa he had not money enough to pay the expense of bringing his family from Illinois, and his prosperity is due to his industry and good management.  Mr. and Mrs. Christianson have had four children.  A son and daughter died in early chi ldhood.  Another son, Lars, was killed on the farm in 1864, aged nine years.  Their only living child, Christian J., was born in La Salle County, Illinois, October 26, 1855, and still lives with his parents.  Mr. Christianson and his son are adherents of the Republican party.  The family are members of the Lutheran church.  Mr. Christianson is one of the highly respected men of the township, which he has assisted so materially to develop, and is now reaping the reward of his early years of toil and hardship.

More About ANDERS CHRISTIANSON:
Burial: Mamrelund Cemetery, Scott Twp, Hamilton County, IA
Census: 1860, Story City, Norway Twp, Hamilton County, IA
   
Children are listed above under (8) Anders Christianson.

19.  OLE ANDREAS LARSON6 TJERNAGEL (HELGA5 PEDERSDATTER, PEDER4 ANDERSSON, ANDERS3 HALVARDSON, HALVARD2 ANDERSSON, ANDERS1 HANSSON) was born 10 Apr 1836 in Lien Farm, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway, and died 12 May 1919 in Follinglo Farm, Scott Twp, Hamilton County, Iowa.  He married MARTHA KARINA ANDERSDATTER 11 Jun 1861 in Norway, La Salle County, IL.  She was born 10 Jul 1845 in Avaldsness, Norway, and died 16 Apr 1907 in Story City, Hamilton County, IA.

Notes for OLE ANDREAS LARSON TJERNAGEL:
Ole Andreas Larson Tjernagel

Ole Andreas Larson Tjernagel was born in Lien, in the parish of Sveen, Norway, the 10th of April, 1836.  When he was fifteen years of age the fa mily moved to the neighboring farm of Tjernagel.

He celebrated his twentieth birthday on board a sailship on the way to America, and after a long and hard journey over the Great Blue and then up through the land he arrived at his destination, namely Ottawa, Illinois, on the 4th of July, 1856. His first place of residence here was at the home of his cousin Peder Tjernagel. The latter had  immigrated a few years earlier and now lived near Norway, Illinois. He soon obtained work in the hayfield and harvest, and the pay was the highest any one received at that time for such work, namely 50¢ a day. The following seven years he hired out at $150.00 per year.

When four years had passed Ole and his cousin, Christian Logan Tjernagel, boarded a train in Ottawa and traveled to Iowa City. At that time this was the end of the Rock Island Railway. From there they walked ac ross t he prairie on the long journey to a sister's place in Hamilton County, Iowa.  At that time Marshalltown was a small inland town, and Nevada was only a post office, but now the chief town in Story County.

They arrived at the home of Peder Larsen (commonly called "Store Per ") w ho was Ole's brother, and his wife Madeline was Christian's sister. At that time they lived in a little log house, happy and contented. Ole and Christian found real noble pioneer hospitality at the home of the se folks. "Store Per" had a stack of grain, about as much as could be hau led in two loads, and a pig. And the only thing that sort of lay heavily on his heart was the thought that if only these dear visitors had come a little later he would have had his grain threshed and the pig in the barrel, so he would have been able to entertain his guests in royal fashion. - Oh, for the good old hospitality of the pioneer days!

It was at that time that Ole Andreas, as he was commonly called, bought the forty acres which now are the first unit of the modern and beautif ul Follinglo Farm, one of Iowa's exemplary farms. He paid $4.00 an acre, which at that time was a great price. Now it is worth between four and five hundred dollars an acre.

Ole went back to Illinois and worked for Anfin Anfinson Krabbetvedt, and there he met a fair and kind young girl whose name was Martha Anderson Follinglo. He found his joy in her and they were married on the eleventh of June, 1861. The happy young couple rented the Quam house, and settled do wn in their own home. But in the spring of 1864 they packed everything they owned in a prairie schooner and set their course in the direction of Iowa.

So that the thousands of our readers in Norway may understand, we shall explain that a  "prairie schooner" was the usual name for a wagon, used in moving, having white canvas on the sides and the top, and in these they drove during the day and slept at night, sometimes hundreds of miles from whi te people while Indians prowled about They were brave peopl e, these viking sons and daughters. And when they struck out thus toward the west in order to find and give shape to their future home their breast swelled with courage and ambition to work. But never could they have dreamed the adven­ture-story that would develop from the fact that they journeyed here and started the world's most beautiful settlements which developed as a result of toil and steadfast cooperation. These traveling wagons were a common sight out over the uncultivated prairies of the northwest fifty years ago.

Ole and Martha came to their new home a little northeast of the present Story City and obtained lodging at the home of Anders Tjernagel unt il they were able to build their own house on their own land. This house was the first real frame farm house to be built between Nevada and Rose Grove, a distance of about fifty miles. Many had, in later years, moved in and settled along the river, but all these had built log houses.

The departed has continuously lived on this same farm with the excepti on of a few years when he moved to Story City with his wife and their one daughter. It was there that the bride of his youth died on the sixteenth of April, 1907, and then he moved back again to the farm. He has been s trong and active all the time, interested in everything and in all h is de ar ones. It was only the last year that he began to show signs of becoming older. His faithful heart became tired after more than eighty three years of work, and longed for rest. It was only the last few weeks of his life that he was confined to his bed, and in the morning of the twelf th of May, 1919, his body yielded up the spirit.

To this honored couple were born six sons and two daughters. The one daughter died in her childhood. The survivors are: L. J. Tjernagel, F. G. Tjernagel, N, Tjernagel, Pastor H. M. Tjernagel, M. O. Tjernagel, Bertha C. Tjernagel and Dr. G. A. Tjernagel.  Besides these there are eighteen grandchildren, four great grand­children, two sisters, Mrs. Nels Peterson and Mr s. Barbru Anderson, who survive him. These sisters are of the ages of seventy seven and eighty years respectively. Both followed their brother's remains to the grave.

A large number of relatives and friends also followed the depart ed to hi s, last earthly resting place Friday afternoon, the fifteen th of May, 191 9.  He was laid to rest on Mamrelund cemetery, belonging to North St. Petri Congregation. Pastor Guttebo officiated. His six sons bore the remains of their dear father to the place where his body shall rest until that great Day.

Ole always showed great interest in the upbringing of his children in church, school and home. He always did the most difficult work so that his chi ldren should get the opportunity to learn. Never did the children become so big that they had to be kept home from school in order to do the work on the farm.

In the church he was as Rev. Amlund, his pastor, said: "A pillar". Faithful Lutheran that he was, he never followed along with doubt­ful currents which at certain times became popular. And from time to time it has been evident that he was right. He never took part in anything before he had thoroughly studied the matter, and when his decision was made he stood steadfast as a mountain.

Honor be to the worthy pioneer: Always on the side of that which was right and always eager to uphold a good matter; always honorable and faithful; always friendly and obliging; always the same.

To many the course of his life may seem to have been very quiet. But behold what accomplishments these strong, faithful and diligent early pionee rs have left behind them. Look now at the place where he and his young bride built their first nest. See the large, influential and honorable relationship they have left behind, who will remember and hold in resp ect this their faithful and heroic father and his heroic wife, their mother, acknowledging that they owe everything to them.

If only our younger generations would, like them, thus honor the old forefathers who labored here, then our Land would in truth be a happy land.

(This article, in the Norwegian language, was found in the files of the Tjernagel Family in the archives of the Iowa State Historical Society, Iowa City. It appeared originally in "Visergutten" of Thursday, May 22, 191 9. It was translated and multigraphed by Adolph M. Harstad of Madison, Wis consin, in the month of July, 1976.  Translation reprinted here with permission of Peter Tjernagel Harstad, son of and executor of the Estate of Adolph M. Harstad.)

More About OLE ANDREAS LARSON TJERNAGEL:
Immigration: 1855, Per 1900 census

More About MARTHA KARINA ANDERSDATTER:
Immigration: 1856, Per 1900 census
   
Children of OLE TJERNAGEL and MARTHA ANDERSDATTER are:
42.    i.    LARS (LEWIS) JOHAN7 TJERNAGEL, b. 28 Jun 1862, Norway, LaSalle County, Illinois; d. 11 Jun 1950, Story City, Story County, Iowa.
43.    ii.    PEDER GUSTAV TJERNAGEL, b. 17 May 1865, Follinglo Farm, Scott Township, Hamilton County, IA; d. 09 Apr 1932, New Hampton, IA.
    iii.    NEHEMIAS TJERNAGEL, b. 28 Mar 1868, Follinglo Farm, Scott Township, Hamilton County, Iowa; d. 17 May 1958, Follinglo Farm, Scott Twp, Hamilton County, Iowa.

Notes for NEHEMIAS TJERNAGEL:
NEHEMIAS TJERNAGEL

(With permission from his estate, this is a summary of Neelak Serawlook Tj ernagel's Nehemias Tjernagel: An Afectionate Biography (1976), wi th additional insights by Peter Tjernagel Harstad)

Musician, farmer, writer, and world traveler, Nehemias was born 28 March 1868 at Follinglo Farm, four miles north of Story City, third of the eight children of Ole Andrias Larson Tjernagel and his wife Martha Karin a, bo th natives of Norway. In 1873 Nehemias began his education at the Sheldall School, officially District No. 1, Scott Township, Hamilton Count y. A teacher, W. A Wier, taught the Tjernagel children to play a reed organ. Another, Hans Dahle, taught four part singing.

Nehemias was barely in his teens when three Tjernagel and four Henderson boys organized the Riverside Orchestra. He played both cornet and clarinet. In 1886 the boys purchased their obsolete school for use as a practice room. They engaged the services, successively, of a professional musician from Norway, Anton Pederson, and of a composer and editor of church music, John Dahle. The boys delighted audiences throughout Iowa as The Riverside Band.

In 1886 Nehemias enrolled at the Iowa Agricultural College at Ames where he studied piano under Anna Gaff, a graduate of the Leipzig Conservatory of Music, and played solo clarinet in the college band. One eveni ng the college president brought his flute to Nehemias' room for a jam session. When Miss Gaff heard that lack of money would prevent Nehemias fr om returning for the next term she offered him free organ lessons. However, the time had come to go to work.

Nehemias could save little toward his dream of studying in Leipzig on his salary as cashier in his brother Lewis' Story City bank, a position he held for three years. Meanwhile, he studied organ and choral mus ic and published two of his most popular pieces, the Story City Overture and the Daily News Waltz.

Next, he worked briefly for a publishing company in Minneapolis whe re he a lso played in a band. When his brother established the L. J. Tjernagel Livestock Commission Co. in Chicago, Nehemias served as bookkeeper a nd studied clarinet at the Chicago Musical College. It pleased him to hear a performance of his Story City Overture at the Chicago Armory.

In 1892 Nehemias contracted typhoid fever. By mistake, he drank a dose of carbolic acid  "permanently deranged" his colon. A pri or case of scarlet fever left his eyes intolerant of artificial light. A nephew put it charitably; he lived thereafter "in an attitude of reliance on others for the provision of the basic needs of his life."

He refused to abandon his dream and in June 1892 boarded a ship for Europe. The young composer and performer on "almost every orchestral instrument" planned to visit Norway, a magazine reported, then proceed to Leipzig for three years of study.

Nehemias lost focus for his aspirations. For more than a year he wandered through Norway and Sweden worrying about his health. Then the Panic of 1893 dried up his support from home. He wintered in Berlin and arrived in Leipzig 9 May 1894. Eight piano lessons at the Royal Conservatory constituted his formal study there. Nehemias pawned his clarinet to travel extensively in Europe. Ordered home, he proceeded via Greece, Palestine, Eg ypt, and Italy before buying a steerage ticket to the United Stat es aboard the S. S. Suevia. The captain took pity and invited him to bunk and eat with the officers. Nehemias responded by composing the Suevia Walt z. He arrived at Follinglo Farm in time to record his occupation as "musician" in the 1895 Iowa census.

A gentle, loquacious, unconventional, and often sickly soul, Nehemi as made friends readily. If conversation did not cut through political, class, or gender barriers his music usually could. Lifelong, he walked long distances. He absorbed detail. He crossed paths with "greats" at home and abroad and held his own in the presence of maestros, opera divas, theologians, and political leaders. However, he could not earn a living as a musician in rural Iowa.

Nehemias attempted to capitalize on his travels by offering lectures spiced with Sciopticon views of sites he had visited in the Holy Land. The lecture circuit proved too strenuous. "It hurt," when a younger brother suggested that he put on overalls, "not the overalls, but the idea of giving up . . . music, and now this."

In 1897 Nehemias joined his brothers Peder and Martin in taking over t he f arm from their parents. This unlikely partnership made Follinglo a model farm and a Mecca for visitors including Nehemias' musical friends. He never married but experienced the warmth of family life in the household of his brother Peder and wife Jennie. Nieces and nephews affectionately called him "Unko." In this setting the bachelor farmer never learned to operate modern farm machinery or to drive an automobile. He kept records and at tended to such chores as his precarious health would allow. The care of farrowing sows became his specialty.

Nehemias' greatest public recognition and his most cherished compositi on came when he no longer considered himself a professional musician. He cross ed the Atlantic on the Lusitania early in 1910 and was prese nt at Christiania (now Oslo) when Theodore Roosevelt received the Nobel peace prize. Thus on 5 May a "skinny Iowa farmer in thread-bare coat, bowler hat, and rubbers" stood attentively while the royal band struck up Sousa's Stars and S tripes followed by The Roosevelt Overture by "N. Tjernagel."

The humble Iowan received ample, if not lavish recognition on his second t rip to Norway. While there, word arrived from Follinglo Farm that his litt le niece Madit had died suddenly. Grief-stricken, "Unko" compos ed and publ ished a beautiful song, Lille Madit (Little Margaret), which concert singer Carsten Woll recorded for Columbia Records. This treasure is still performed as is some of Nehemias' sacred music.

In 1911 Nehemias organized an American tour of 50 concerts for the Norwegian organist, pianist, composer, and teacher Eivind Alnaes. Follinglo Farm served as the base of operations. When the tour was over Nehemias settl ed down to four decades of farm routine.

Lifelong, Nehemias found time to read and write. Travels abroad provided m aterial for numerous articles and three books, two of which went in to second editions. He addressed a wide range of topics in newspapers, fa rm journals, Lutheran periodicals, and historical magazines. As he aged, his mind and his Oliver typewriter turned frequently to the pioneer period of central Iowa history. The Story City Herald and The Palimpsest published dozens of his historical pieces; eight more appeared in The Annals of Iowa between 1951 and 1955. Nehemias anthologized his music in a 62 -page portfolio presented to a niece in 1944.  His last book was an anthology, Contributions to Church Periodicals (Story City, 1955).

Nehemias died peacefully at Follinglo Farm on Norway's national holiday, 17 May 1958, and was buried at Mumrelund Cemetery nearby.

Note:  Presented with the permission of Peter Tjernagel Harstad.

44.    iv.    HELGE (HENRY) MATHIAS TJERNAGEL, b. 23 May 1871, Follinglo Farm, Scott Township, Hamilton County, IA; d. 13 Feb 1940.
    v.    BERTHA KJERSTINE TJERNAGEL, b. 07 Oct 1874, Follinglo Farm, Scott Township, Hamilton County, IA; d. 11 Nov 1879, Follinglo Farm, Scott Township, Hamilton County, IA.
45.    vi.    MARTIN OLAI TJERNAGEL, b. 02 Jul 1877, Follinglo Farm, Scott Township, Hamilton County, IA; d. 06 Nov 1959.
    vii.    BERTHA KJERSTINE TJERNAGEL, b. 10 May 1881, Follinglo Farm, Scott Township, Hamilton County, IA; d. 16 Mar 1969, Oakdale, Iowa.
46.    viii.    GUSTAV ADOLPH TJERNAGEL, b. 18 May 1884, Follinglo Farm, Scott Township, Hamilton County, IA; d. 01 Oct 1954, Pasadena, CA.


20.  BARBRU6 LARSDATTER (HELGA5 PEDERSDATTER, PEDER4 ANDERSSON, ANDERS3 HALVARDSON, HALVARD2 ANDERSSON, ANDERS1 HANSSON) was born 14 Oct 1839 in Lien Farm, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway, and died 05 Nov 1926 in Story City, Story County, Iowa.  She married OLE ANDREAS ANDERSSON 24 May 1859 in Sveio, Hordaland, Norway.  He was born 14 Nov 1831 in Asbu, Norway, and died 14 Jan 1885 in Tjernagel Nordre Farm, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway.

Notes for BARBRU LARSDATTER:
Vitals courtesy of Mildrid Tjernagel Nickson.

Visit of Nehemias Tjernagel to home of "Aunt Barbru" in 1892 from h is book "Walking Trips in Norway", published by Lutheran Press Concern, 1917, p ages 214-217:

On my arrival at Tjernagel haven a boat was launched upon the fretful sea, only to bob crazily up and down alongside, seemingly helpless enough with its own burden without having an extra wabbling weight or two adde d. To exchange the stable ship's deck for such flimsy, tottering craft, is one of the least inviting experiences that I know. It is impossible to decide on which foot to stand, and with the proper amount of dizzine ss and nausea added to the general misery, and also excite­ment and r is k, one feels that life hangs but by a slender, uncertain thread. Once out of the boat I pushed up the steps of the diminutive wharf, hurriedl y, as when one closes the door fearsomely behind one's back, to be rid of the dark at night.

Very near the landing place, and typical enough, are situated a country st ore, the post-office, the store-keeper's dwelling, and a freight and boat- house. Here the country folk within a distance of half a dozen miles or so get their mail, which is left by steamers several times during t he week, their groceries, and a small part of their clothing and foot -wea r. Here they deliver their little stores of eggs and butter, and here they discuss the weather and the fishing prospects, and hear the ne ws of their neighbors as well as "Amerika-nyt." Once upon a time, when the noted Rejar Tjernagel was living, there had been great bustle and activity in the place, numberless fishing vessels touching here on their w ay through t he fjord, coming or going, when on fishing expeditions. Thus Rejar's name became known all over the western coast. Since then a peace as of a hundred years seems to have settled over all, greeting me with a Sabbath stil lness as I wended my way from the hamlet and seashore, t owards the homestead of my fathers - the present home of Aunt Barbru, father's sister and former playmate.

Like all old-fashioned dwellings in Norway, the house was rather low, wi th the rooms, both upstairs and downstairs, to correspond. The windows were few enough, and because of a rather awkward arrangement, the livi ng room was less cheerful than it would have been if the sun could have p eep ed in from the south.  A small kitchen and a corner to store fuel - peat mostly - occupied one end of the building, and from here an ancient oven was run through the wall into the dining and sitting room, answering t he pu rpose of a cook stove at one end and a heating stove at the other. It emitted considerable smoke from the slow-burning peat, but otherwise answered its purpose very well, considering its age, which was two centuries. On top of it could be baked "flad-brød," oaten cakes, and other e atable s. It took longer to make the kettle boil with peat than with wood or coal; but once well begun, it kept the proper boiling temperature without cha nge if properly tended. The end of the stove sticking through the wall in to the sitting-room stood on very long legs and enabled Bendick, Aunt Barbru's youngest son, to crawl in under for his nap, or for what ever other important purpose came into his head.

The visitor reigned in state in the "kammers," or sleeping room, at the ot her end of the building, where the pictures and knick-knacks belonging to the family were gathered, and where some of the best dresses we re hung, and where the bed had the best feathers, the best coverlets and many other best things of which a well-­appointed sleeping room can boast. It was impossible to suffer from cold when buried under such an avalanche of bed covers; nor did I.

Dear old aunt Barbru made the best oaten cakes I have ever eaten. They are a most wholesome article of food. Indigestion would speedily take flight if they were more generally found on the table. My aunt's cak es were made of good, clean oats, dried on a drying oven, the whole grains ground fine, and then, mixed with potatoes, made into flat round cak es which were b aked through and through, over a moderate fire, on top of the oven. With a little butter and cheese on top, and eaten with sips or spoonfu ls of sour milk, they make a food that Norwegian giants formerly thrived upon. Sad to say, this giant's food is slowly but surely going out of fashion even in Norway, and richer, more concentrated foods a re taking its place.
   
Children of BARBRU LARSDATTER and OLE ANDERSSON are:
47.    i.    JOHAN ANDREAS7 ANDERSON, b. 10 Sep 1859, Tjernagel Nordre Farm, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway; d. 1942, Tjernagel Nordre Farm, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway.
    ii.    HELGA GURINE ANDERSON, b. 10 Nov 1862, Tjernagel Nordre Farm, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway; d. 14 Jan 1932.
48.    iii.    LARS ANDERSON TJERNAGEL, b. 12 Sep 1865, Tjernagel Nordre Farm, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway; d. 05 Mar 1941, Story County, Iowa.
49.    iv.    AAGETA (AGATHA) ANDERSON, b. 21 Sep 1868, Tjernagel Nordre Farm, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway; d. 1957.
50.    v.    PEDER OLAI ANDERSON TJERNAGEL, b. 10 Dec 1873, Tjernagel Nordre Farm, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway; d. 12 Jan 1916, Randall, Iowa.
    vi.    REINERT ANDREAS ANDERSON, b. 18 Nov 1876, Tjernagel Nordre Farm, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway; d. 31 Jan 1877, Tjernagel Nordre Farm, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway.
    vii.    BENDICK ANDREAS ANDERSON, b. 29 Apr 1879, Tjernagel Nordre Farm, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway; d. 1968, Story City, Iowa; m. MARY CHRISTIANSON; b. 1865, Iowa; d. 1950.

More About BENDICK ANDREAS ANDERSON:
Burial: Mamrelund Cemetery, rural Story City, Iowa

More About MARY CHRISTIANSON:
Burial: 1950, Mamrelund Cemetery, Hamilton County, IA


21.  LARSINE6 LARSDATTER (HELGA5 PEDERSDATTER, PEDER4 ANDERSSON, ANDERS3 HALVARDSON, HALVARD2 ANDERSSON, ANDERS1 HANSSON) was born 09 Jul 1842 in Lien Farm, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway, and died 27 Jun 1927 in USA.  She married NILS PETERSON 03 Apr 1863 in Norway.  He was born in Norway, and died 15 Sep 1913 in Norway.

More About LARSINE LARSDATTER:
Burial: Mamrelund Cemetery, Hamilton County, IA
   
Children of LARSINE LARSDATTER and NILS PETERSON are:
    i.    HELGA GURINE7 PETERSON, b. 31 Aug 1863; d. 24 Sep 1864, Iowa.
51.    ii.    PETER LEWIS PETERSON, b. 19 Feb 1866; d. 06 Jan 1929.
    iii.    HELGA PETERSON, b. 20 Jun 1868; d. 18 Feb 1939.
52.    iv.    THEODORA (DORA) PETERSON, b. 23 Oct 1870.
    v.    JOHANNES PETERSON, b. 22 Dec 1872.
    vi.    KARINA PETERSON, b. 08 Apr 1875.
    vii.    JOHANNA PETERSON, b. 17 Apr 1877.
    viii.    AGNES PETERSON, b. 24 Apr 1879.
    ix.    LARSINE REGINE PETERSON, b. 28 May 1881.
    x.    AGNES PETERSON, b. 27 Aug 1883.
    xi.    MARTHA GURINE PETERSON, b. 11 Dec 1885.
53.    xii.    NILS JOHANNES PETERSON, b. 29 Jan 1889.


Generation No. 4

22.  OLE ANDREAS7 CHRISTIANSON (PETER6, CHRISTEN5 PEDERSON, PEDER4 ANDERSSON, ANDERS3 HALVARDSON, HALVARD2 ANDERSSON, ANDERS1 HANSSON) was born 23 May 1847 in Tjernagel Søre Farm, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway, and died 08 May 1911 in USA.  He married (1) GRETHE RANDINE FINSTED 15 Sep 1871 in Norway, IL.  She was born Abt. 1845 in Norway, and died Aft. 1880 in USA.  He married (2) ELDORA IRINE LOGAN 08 Jan 1895 in First Methodist-Episcopal Church, Ottawa, IL.  She was born Feb 1856 in Ohio, and died 13 Jan 1928 in Ottawa, La Salle County, IL.

More About OLE ANDREAS CHRISTIANSON:
Christening: 30 May 1847, Tjernagel, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway
Emigration: 16 May 1849, Stavanger, Norway on Brig "Favoriten"
Immigration: 28 Jun 1849, New York on Brig "Favoriten"

More About ELDORA IRINE LOGAN:
Burial: Jan 1928, Ottawa Avenue Cemetery, Bushnell Section, F-11, adjacent to fence.
Cause of death (Facts Pg): 13 Jan 1928, Ryburn-King Hospital, Ottawa, IL, of pneumonia.
   
Children of OLE CHRISTIANSON and GRETHE FINSTED are:
    i.    BERTHA M. S.8 CHRISTIANSON, b. 10 Jul 1872, Illinois; d. Aft. 1956; m. JOSEF (JOSEPH) ANTON FAULHABER, 05 Dec 1903, Story County, IA; b. 12 May 1870, Germany; d. 12 Dec 1932, Iowa.

Notes for BERTHA M. S. CHRISTIANSON:
Birth date from Peter Christianson probate papers.

    ii.    MARIA CHRISTIANSON, b. 08 Jan 1874, Illinois.

Notes for MARIA CHRISTIANSON:
Birth date from Peter Christianson probate papers.

More About MARIA CHRISTIANSON:
Baptism: 22 Feb 1874, West Lisbon Lutheran Church, Kendall County, Illinois

    iii.    ANNA HELEN CHRISTIANSON, b. 21 Dec 1875, Illinois; d. 18 Jul 1952, Minnesota; m. OLE O VALEN; b. Abt. 1868, Norway; d. 31 Oct 1952, Minnesota.

Notes for ANNA HELEN CHRISTIANSON:
Birth date from Peter Christianson probate papers and church records.

Name in West Lisbon Lutheran Church baptismal records recorded as "An na He len Tjernagel".  Father name recorded as "Ole Christian Tjernagel ".  (Bapt ismal record courtesy of Owen Thompson.)

More About ANNA HELEN CHRISTIANSON:
Baptism: 20 Feb 1876, West Lisbon Lutheran Church, Kendall County, Illinois

    iv.    PETER OLE CHRISTIANSON, b. 29 Jul 1877, Illinois; d. 09 Mar 1956, Iowa; m. REGINA O. BOYD, 17 Feb 1896, Randall, Hamilton County, IA; b. May 1875, Skaanevik, Norway; d. 02 May 1956, Story City, Story County, Iowa.

Notes for PETER OLE CHRISTIANSON:
Baptismal record from West Lisbon Lutheran Church records his name as "P et er Joakim Christianson".

Obituary in Ames (Iowa) Daily Tribune 19 March 1956, page six.

P. O. Christianson

STORY CITY-Funeral services for P. O. Christianson were held Mar ch 1 2, at Bethel Lutheran church, Story City, the Rev. A. J. Bringle offi ciati ng.  Lillian Alsager, Mrs. Oscar Ritland and Mrs, Bert Stenslasd pro vid ed special music.  Burial was in Story City Municipal Cemetery.  Ser vi ng as pallbearers were: Martin Olson, Sherman Flattebo, Magnus Olson, L eR oy Meyers, Bernie Jacobson and Thaery Wierson.

Peter O. Christianson was born in Illinois, July 29, 1877. He moved to S to ry City when young. He spent the rest of his life there. He was baptiz ed a nd confirmed in the Norwegian Lutheran church.  In 1896 he was mar ri ed to Regina Boyd at Randall. The couple had eight children.  He had s pe nt 38 years of his life working at the Farmers Grain Co. Mr. Christia ns on had been hospitalized since Jan. 11, when he fell and broke h is hi p. He died March 9, at 78.

He was preceded in death by two sons: Bert and Selmer, and a daughte r, Mr s. M. C. Chance.  Surviving besides his wife are three daughters, Mr s, Del ia Havnen, Washington, D.C.; Mrs. Floyd (Hilda) Hamm, Burbank, Cali f.; a nd Mrs. Joe (Emma) Dobbe, SIater; two sons, Arthur H., Burbank, Cali f.; a nd Palmer C., Story City; 15 grandchildren and 2 great grandchildre n; a si ster, Mrs. Bertha Falhauber, Belmond; and a brother, Albert, Excel sior, Mi nn.

Among those from a distance attending the funeral were: Mr. and Mrs. Je ro me Havnen of Oklahoma City, Okla.; Mr. and Mrs. Donovan Dobbe and son C rai g, Iowa City; and Mr, A, M, Christianson and daughter, Mrs. Delia Clap p, E xcelsior, Minn.

More About PETER OLE CHRISTIANSON:
Baptism: 23 Sep 1877, West Lisbon Lutheran Church, Kendall County, Illinois
Burial: 12 Mar 1956, Fairview-Story City Municipal Cemetery, Story County, Iowa
Occupation: Worked at Farmers Grain Company for 38 years.

More About REGINA O. BOYD:
Burial: 1956, Fairview-Story City Cemetery, Story City, IA
Immigration: 1880

    v.    ALBERT M. CHRISTENSON, b. 29 Jul 1879, Iowa; d. 14 May 1960, Eitel Hospital, Minneapolis, Hennepin County, MN; m. JULIA M WICKS, 21 Feb 1901, Iowa; b. Abt. 1882, Iowa.

   
Child of OLE CHRISTIANSON and ELDORA LOGAN is:
    vi.    CHRISTIAN OTTO8 CHRISTIANSON, b. 26 Jan 1896, Norway, Illinois; d. 01 Dec 1960, Oakland, Alameda County, CA.

Notes for CHRISTIAN OTTO CHRISTIANSON:
Birth date and birth location from WW1 draft card.  Draft card physic al de scription:  Medium height, slender build, gray eyes and light bro wn hair.

More About CHRISTIAN OTTO CHRISTIANSON:
Cause of death (Facts Pg): 01 Dec 1960, Lobar pneumonia
Occupation: 1960, Gardener


23.  CHRISTIAN PEDER (C P)7 CHRISTIANSON (PETER6, CHRISTEN5 PEDERSON, PEDER4 ANDERSSON, ANDERS3 HALVARDSON, HALVARD2 ANDERSSON, ANDERS1 HANSSON) was born 14 Sep 1848 in Lien Farm near Tjernagel, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway, and died 11 May 1913 in Iowa City, IA.  He married REBECCA (BECK) QUAM 17 Jan 1870 in Norway, IL, daughter of OLE QUAM and GERTRUDE MOE.  She was born 18 Jun 1852 in Norway, IL, and died 15 Dec 1920 in Long Beach, CA.

Notes for CHRISTIAN PEDER (C P) CHRISTIANSON:
ENTRY FROM "Biographies of Florence Township, Benton County, Iowa". (187 8 )

CHRISTIANSON, C. P., dealer in grain and stock, and farmer, Florence; bo rn in Norway, Europe, Sept. 14, 1848. Married Rebecca Quam in La Salle Co., Ill., in 1870; she was born in La Salle Co., Ill., in 1852; they have three children -- Noah Webster, Porter Ollen and Rosa Barthema. Has 232 acr es of land, valued at $45 per acre; owns warehouse and elevator, valu ed at $4,000; cattle, worth $1,000; house and lot in Florence, valued at $ 800.

OBITUARY:
THE VINTON EAGLE
"A PROGRESSIVE NEWSPAPER"
SEMI-WEEKLY - TUESDAY AND FRIDAY MORNINGS
VINTON, IOWA, FRIDAY MORNING, MAY 16, 1913

C. P. CHRISTIANSON GONE TO FINAL REST
Sketch of the Life of a Former Prominent Business Man of Norway, Benton County.

Following this preface is a sketch of one of the most prominent business men of this county.   As stated in the sketch he was a resident of Nor way, Florence township. He lived there for thirty years and was engaged in the grain business. He was uniformly courteous to his patrons and strictly honest. He was a natural leader of men, hence in every material intere st of the town and southern part of the county he was consulted. He was a man of rare good judgment and his advice was constantly sought by h is friends and neighbors.  He was one of the leaders of the republican par ty both in Florence township and the southern part of the county. He was what was termed one of the "wheel­horses" of the party. He always took more interest in party welfare than in individual ambitions. The ambiti on of the individual was secondary to the interest of the party. In the party councils his advise was always sought. This advice was of a character that tended to the upbuilding and sustaining of the party's welfare.

For some time Mr. Christianson had been a resident of Iowa City. One of the daughters was a student at the university and Mr. Christians on being out of business moved there so she might have a home. Norway re­mained practically his home and to that village his body was taken to be laid at rest in the Norway cemetery. The last sad rites were said Wednesday afternoon and the many friends of the family gathered to participate. He was a man of great heart and soul.

Christian P. Christianson was born September 14, 1848,  in Tjernagle, Norway, Europe and came, when only a child of nine months, with his parent s, Mr. and Mrs. Peter Christianson, to Norway, Illinois.

Mr. Christianson's education was obtained at the public schools of La Salle county, the Newark Academy and later at the Jenning's Seminary of Aurora, Illinois.

On January 17, 1870, he was united in marriage to Miss Rebecca Quam, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. O. A. Quam, of Norway, Illinois. The first two years of their married life were spent in Illinois and on September 5, 1872 they settled at Norway, Benton county, Iowa.

Here, for over thirty years, he was engaged in an active business lif e, being one of the men who materially aided in the development of southern Ben ton county. While Mr. Christianson never sought or would accept any political office, he never shirked the duties and responsibiliti es of citizenship but was holding, during all those years, positions of trust and public confidence in both civic and religous bodies.

Mr. Christianson was confirmed in the Evangelical Lutheran church and later transferred his membership to the Methodist Episcopal church at Norway, Iowa.

Ten years ago he retired from an active business life and about three years ago Mr. and Mrs. Christianson moved to Iowa City. Since his retirement, they have spent several winters in the south on account of his health and it was during the past winter that Mr. Christianson's strength rapidly failed and after their recent return to Iowa City it became evident that he was fast sinking.

On Sunday, May 11, at one o'clock he peacefully passed away surrounded by his loved ones. At the time of his death he was 64 years, 7 months and  27 days of age.

Mr, Christianson is survived by his wife and five children, namely: No ah W ebster of Cherokee, Iowa; Porter Ollen, Vinton Iowa; Rose Berthema Enwall, Aurora, Ill.; Eugene, Houston Texas; Lillian Rebecca Stoner, Iowa City, Iowa, who mourn the loss of a kind, most loving and considerate hus band and father.  Beside the immediate family a large circle of relatives and friends mourn over his death.

His quiet unassuming personality was appreciated most by those who knew him best.

More About CHRISTIAN PEDER (C P) CHRISTIANSON:
Burial: May 1913, Norway, IA
Christening: 01 Oct 1848, Tjernagel, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway
Emigration: 16 May 1849, Stavanger, Norway on Brig "Favoriten"
Immigration: 28 Jun 1849, New York on Brig "Favoriten"

Notes for REBECCA (BECK) QUAM:
IOWA CITY PRESS-CITIZEN, JAN. 7, 1921, PAGE 7

OBITUARY
Mrs. C. P. Christianson passed away at Long Beach, California, Dec. 1 5, 19 20, after a very brief illness.  She was the eldest daught er of O. A. a nd Julia Quam.  She was born at Norway, La Salle County, Ill inois, June 1 8, 1852.  Her early life was spent in that vicinity.  On Ja n. 17, 1870, s he was married to C. P. Christianson and shortly thereaft er moved to Norwa y. Iowa.   In 1910 they removed to Iowa City.

She was an active and faithful christian woman and took a deep inte re st in the life of the Methodist Episcopal church of which she was f or ma ny years a member.  For more than forty years she was an ardent wo rk er in the Woman's Christian Temperance Union and was for a number of y ea rs President of the Union at Norway, Iowa.

Mrs. Christianson was possessed of a kindly and cheerful disposition a nd b rought gladness and encouragement both by words and example to all w ho ca me in contact with her.  She was especially devoted to her family a nd h er love for and interest in those who were near and dear to her was u nceas ing.

Mr. Christianson was laid to rest nearly eight years ago.  The immedia te s urviving members of the family are: N. W. Christianson, Des Moi ne s; P. O. Christianson, Vinton; Mrs. Rose C. S. Enwall, Hobart, Indi an a; C. E. Christianson, Houston, Tex.; Mrs. Lillian C. Stoner, Iowa City .

Mrs. Christianson's aged father preceded her in death by only two we ek s.  The following brothers and sisters survive:  A. J. Quam, Mrs. Lew S chl anbusch, Mrs. Henry Mosey, and V. J. Quam.

More About REBECCA (BECK) QUAM:
Burial: Dec 1920, Norway, IA
Cause of death (Facts Pg): Celebral Hemorrhage
   
Children of CHRISTIAN CHRISTIANSON and REBECCA QUAM are:
    i.    NOAH WEBSTER (WEB)8 CHRISTIANSON, b. 19 Nov 1870, Norway, IL; d. 26 Jul 1943, Ross, CA of heart failure; m. FLORENCE MARY BENSON, 18 Jun 1894, Methodist Episcopal Church, Norway, Benton County, IA; b. 28 Apr 1870, Belle Plaine, Benton County, IA; d. 13 Jul 1932, Iowa City, IA of malignant lymphoma.

More About NOAH WEBSTER (WEB) CHRISTIANSON:
Burial: 31 Jul 1943, Laurel Hill Cemetery, Des Moines, IA

More About FLORENCE MARY BENSON:
Burial: 16 Jul 1932, Laurel Hill Cemetery, Des Moines, IA

    ii.    PORTER JEREMIAH CHRISTIANSON, b. 30 Jul 1872; d. 04 Jun 1873.
    iii.    PORTER OLLEN CHRISTIANSON, b. 10 Dec 1873, Benton County, IA; d. 15 Dec 1947, Glendale, CA; m. ELLA R. STEWART, Dec 1900, Benton County, Iowa; b. Abt. 1879, Fremont Township, Benton County, IA; d. 13 Jun 1950, Houston, TX.

Notes for PORTER OLLEN CHRISTIANSON:
The story of Bertha Sabo, The Scotch girl, who came to Norway, a nd is o ur distant relation:

The Sabos consisted of two sisters and a brother. The Sabos lived on t he e ast coast of Scotland. Their business was keeping cows and raising fe ed f or them. An island some distance from the mainland was their pastur e.  Dur ing the warm weather of the summer they kept their cows there a ll of the t ime, night and day. The Sabo sisters, Bertha and Martha, to ok a boat morni ng and evenings and went to the island to milk their co ws and brought ho me the milk where they made butter and cheese.

On one such trip when coming home, a very fierce wind set in from t he we st and took them out away from their island and over onto the Nor th Sea. T he girls were lucky and did not upset and were on the North S ea for two da ys and two nights continually going away from their home a nd towards the c oast of Norway. They would have perished for want of fo od and drink bu t, as luck would have it, they had their evening's milk wi th them in the b oat and subsisted on that.

On the morning of the third day they saw some outlying Islands and tha nk ed God for their deliverance, but they did not know what land they we re ne aring. But, lo and behold, when they neared land they saw men with i mpleme nts of warfare, such as spears, axes and clubs motioning th em to go awa y. The people of the Island thought they were mermaids.  T he weather on t he coast had been awful the last few days and they could n ot believe th at human beings could have survived the storm. They thoug ht that it was so mething supernatural. The girls gave up and prayed to th eir God and sang s ome songs - religious songs - the tunes of which the No rwegians knew. Th ey then thought these girls must be human after al l.  So they let them lan d.  It was not long before some swain made lo ve to Bertha and won. The n, as now, The Tjernagels knew a good thing wh en they saw it.

This young couple settled down near Tjernagel and raised a family. Pe de r, the root of our family tree, is one of the sons. Peder was named a ft er Peder Sabo, the brother they never saw again.
When his sisters never came back, and of course Peder Sabo thought th ey we re lost, he could not stay in his old home, so he went out to see t he wor ld and forget. He landed in Holland where he sought work and got wo rk wi th some Dignitary who was childless and who willed all of his prop er ty to Peder Sabo, with a proviso that Holland should use all his mon ey f or 100 years, after which Peter Sabo's known relatives at that  ti me shou ld divide the estate. A year ago last fall the time was up. The am ou nt  by then was $20,000,000. Some of as were walking on our toes f or a whi le. I wrote to our minister to the Netherlands and asked him to l ook the m atter up. The answer was that if there ever had been anything T he Netherla nds had fixed it in 1856, when they passed a law or ruling th at all moni es claimed by foreigners not collected or proved by 1857, wou ld reve rt to the State. There  the $ 20,000,000. went glimmering.  In the se depre ssed times, I don't suppose they could have paid it anyway. So en deth t he story.  It is no fable about  Bertha Sabo being our ancestor.  C herti 's father's old aunt that I talked to had visited with her when s he w as a girl.  They called her "Scotch Grandma".

Above account was sent to Mrs. H. O. Enwall by L. J. Tjernagel of Sto ry Ci ty, Iowa who has kept the records of our family for many years.

P. O. Christianson.
1933

More About PORTER OLLEN CHRISTIANSON:
Burial: Forest Lawn Cemetery, Glendale, CA

More About ELLA R. STEWART:
Burial: 16 Jun 1950, Forest Lawn Cemetery, Glendale, CA

    iv.    ROSE BERTHEMA CHRISTIANSON, b. 07 Aug 1875, Benton County, IA; d. 24 May 1956, Gainesville, FL; m. HASSE OCTAVIUS ENWALL, 25 Sep 1902, Norway, Benton County, Iowa; b. 09 Jun 1873, Sweden; d. 20 Dec 1947, Gainesville, FL.

More About ROSE BERTHEMA CHRISTIANSON:
Burial: Evergreen Cemetery, Gainesville, FL

Notes for HASSE OCTAVIUS ENWALL:

HAYFORD ON HASSE – FROM ENWALL COLLECTION LETTERS

Hayford Enwall to Ethel Helgren, 31 May 1981:

My father, christened Johannes Octavius Enwall, who later changed his g iv en name to “Hasse”, which was what he was called always, came from a s ma ll village called Tuna, Kalmar Lan, Smoland, Sweden.


Hayford Enwall to Mary Horner, 15 June 1980:

In the 1890s my father (then on his way around the world about whi ch he ch anged his mind), served for three years in what was then called t he Unit ed States Revenue Service, aboard the USS Rush, sister ship of t he Bea r.  Their function was principally to protect the baby seals from t he Russ ian and Japanese poachers in and around the Pribiloffs.  Father di sliked f ish and claimed the reason to be that on this ship they apparent ly had sal mon for breakfast, lunch and dinner, cooked in every possible w ay and d ay after day.


Hayford Enwall to Ethel Helgren and Rose Quam, 10 June 1980:

I was born and lived in Massachusetts while Father was attending Harva rd a nd Boston Universities for his PhD after having received his undergra dua te degree at Northwestern University, during which time he worked h is w ay through, in part, by serving in the Evanston Life Saving Crew.  Af ter s ome years in the Methodist ministry, he decided to go into Universi ty teac hing and in 1921 accepted the post as head of the Department of Ps ycholo gy and Philosophy at the University of Florida.  This was a far c ry from h is attendance as a 14 year old cadet at the Swedish Royal Naviga tion Scho ol at Karlskrona, not far from his birthplace at Tuna in Smol an d.  At 18 he started around the world for practical maritime experien ce b ut decided to stay in this country, after having served for some thr ee yea rs in the United States Revenue Service between San Francisco and t he Prib iloff Islands of Alaska, its function being essentially to prote ct the ba by seals from the Japs’ and Russians’ poaching.

More About HASSE OCTAVIUS ENWALL:
Burial: Evergreen Cemetery, Gainesville, FL
Immigration: 02 Jul 1891, New York, NY on the SS "City of New York".
Retirement: 1945, Professor of Philosophy University of Florida

    v.    CHESTER EUGENE CHRISTIANSON, b. 15 Sep 1879, Norway, Benton County, IA; d. 1936, Iowa; m. LAURA MAE HARTSHORN, 16 Apr 1902; b. 1878, IA; d. 1947.

More About CHESTER EUGENE CHRISTIANSON:
Burial: 1936, Evergreen Cemetery, Clarion, Wright County, IA
Cause of death (Facts Pg): 1936, heart failure

More About LAURA MAE HARTSHORN:
Burial: Evergreen Cemetery, Clarion, Wright County, IA

    vi.    LILLIAN REBECCA CHRISTIANSON, b. 12 Jun 1885, Norway, Benton County, IA; d. 25 Mar 1978, St. Petersburg, Pinellas County, FL; m. DAYTON K. STONER, 03 Aug 1912, Iowa City, Johnson County, Iowa; b. 26 Nov 1883, North Liberty, Johnson County, IA; d. 08 May 1944, Albany, NY.

Notes for LILLIAN REBECCA CHRISTIANSON:
University of Iowa expeditions that Lillian Christianson Stoner participated in with her husband,
Professor Dayton Stoner:

1918 Barbados-Antigua Expedition
            This expedition was conducted by the Graduate College of the State
            University of Iowa. It yielded a variety of marine specimens for the
            university, including reef fishes, tide pool fishes, brachyuan
            Crustacea, Asteriodes, Holothuroidea, Ophiuroidea, Echinoidea,
            Crinoides, Mollusca, Pentatomoidea, and Foraminifora. A geological
            report was compiled by Prof. A.O. Thomas. The expedition was l ed by
            Prof. Charles C. Nutting; other members of this expedition i ncluded:
            Dayton Stoner, John B. Henderson, Walter K. Fisher, Thesle T. Job,
            Morrice Ricker (photographer), Mrs. Charles Nutting (matron of
            expedition), Mrs. Dayton Stoner, Catharine Mullin, Gertrude V an
            Wagenen, Mildred Sykes, Sydney Greenlaw, Mrs. Thesle Job, Mr s. A.O.
            Thomas, H.J. Wehman, Willie Nutting, Dwight Ensign, and Ca Nutting.

1922 Fiji-New Zealand Expedition
            This expedition yielded both specimens of marine life and cultural
            artifacts from the Maori. Cultural artifacts included fishhook s, a
            death mask, a dancing dress, a coat, and sea shells. Members of the
            party included Charles Nutting, A.O. Thomas, R.B. Wylie, Dayton
            Stoner, Waldo Clock, and Mrs. Dayton Stoner.

More About LILLIAN REBECCA CHRISTIANSON:
Burial: 1978, North Liberty Cemetery, North Liberty, IA
Education: 1912, Baccalaureate - State University of Iowa, aka, Iowa State Univ., Iowa City

Notes for DAYTON K. STONER:
OBITUARY:

Source: JOURNAL OF MAMMALOGY Vol. 26, No. 2, May, 1945, pp. 111-113

DAYTON STONER-1883 TO 1944

BY L. L. SNYDER

Dr. Dayton Stoner, then state zoologist of New York, died suddenly at h is home in Albany on May 8, 1944. Although seriously ill in Apri l, 1943, his health improved and he resumed his work at the New York Sta te Museum in September of that year. The fatal attack was sudden and brief. To one who knew Dr. Stoner, it seems altogether possible that his conscientiousness and strong sense of duty may have driven him beyond the limits of his strength and contributed to the shortening of his life-span to 61 years .

Dayton Stoner's experience as a zoologist was wide and his career var ie d. His interest, from student days to the time of his death, includ ed ma ny life forms, and therefore he was particularly suited for the po st he he ld in Albany during recent years. Although his studies and public ations dealt largely with insects (particularly Pentatomoidea) and bir ds (subjec ts of many of his most extensive and detailed investigations ), mammals received his attention regularly from 1907 to the time of h is death.Stoner w as a charter member of the American Society of Mammalogi sts.

Dayton Stoner was born on November 26, 1883, in a small town with a distinctively American name, North Liberty, Johnson County, Iowa. Whether his father, Marcus Stoner, or his mother Nancy (Koser) Stoner, especially di­rected or encouraged their son in the study of nature; I do not know, but I do know that the environment of North Liberty was not devoid of features which might stimulate his interest in natural history. Although the countryside extending back from the Iowa River is pre-eminently dedicat ed to agriculture, a considerable and interesting fauna is harb ored in its fields, pastures and timbered river-bottoms. There is ample precedent to assume that the native creatures of a boy's environment may serve to excite a curiosity and activate an interest in natural science, often as a life work. One can usually detect in the writings of a naturalist some evidence of such early stimulation-a lingering sentiment, a harking back to boyhood experiences. However, in scanning many of the numerous writings of Dayton Stoner, I find no example of this. His writings are characteristically thorough and detailed, but unembellished by  expressions of feeling. Apparently Stoner was ruled rather strictly by two compulsions-one emanating frorn his personal reserve, the other from his scientific discipline.

From the public schools of his home area, Stoner enrolled in 1903 as a s tu dent at the State University of Iowa, which was close by in his nati ve cou nty at Iowa City. There, as an undergraduate and later as a gradua te stude nt, he came under the direct and indirect influence of such outst anding na tural science teachers as, Calvin, MacBride, Nutting, Wickam, Sh imek, Stro msten and Houser. He obtained his B.A. degree in 1907. Continuing his wo rk at the university, making a study of "skulls", he was granted an M.S. d egree in 1909.

For the next five years Stoner served as museum assistant at the universit y. In 1912 he married Lillian R. Christianson, who had been a fellow student at Iowa. In 1913 Stoner served on the Iowa State College (Ames) expedition to Vancouver Island and, although working primarily with insects, he had opportunity to broaden his general zoological knowledge and experience .

In 1914 Stoner was appointed lecturer in zoology at the State University. It was during this period that the writer became acquainted with him, h aving elected to take his course in ornithology. He was a good lectur er, lucid and methodical. Though always serious about his work, he did not ignore the lighter side, and recognized the high value of introduci ng his stud ents to living animals out-of-doors. We made several trips afield early on spring mornings. Opportunity was thus afforded to acquire a little m ore personal contact with Stoner himself.  On such walks Stoner's reser ve melted like the skin-deep frost on ploughed Iowa fields in March. Thoughts of his amiability have clung to my mind as did the Iowa soil to our hiking boots.  To dress in field togs and lay aside the decorum of the classr oom in favor of a companionable walk in the woods a nd fields is a method t hat can be recommended to all teachers of biology.

In 1919 Stoner received his Ph.D. degree at Iowa. His thesis was on t he Scutelleroidea of Iowa, but during the same period he had prepared ano ther contribution better known to mammalogists, namely, "The Rodents of I owa". This latter work has had wide and practical use and is still a valued refer ence book in the mid-west and elsewhere. During the remaind er of the ti me he served the University of Iowa (as Associate, 1919-20; and as Assistant Professor, 1920-28), Stoner had opportunity for a varie ty of experienc es in the field, in laboratories and on expeditions. He taught at the Okoboji Lakeside Laboratory in Iowa during the summer of 1916 and at the Douglas Lake Biological Station in Michigan in 1919 and 1920.In 1918 he was a member of the university's expedition to Barbados and Antigua and in 1922 he made his longest field trip, another university enterprise, visiting Fiji and New Zealand.

Leaving the university in 1928, Stoner joined the staff of the United States Bureau of Entomology as field assistant.  He continued in this capacity for three years.  In 1932 he accepted the post at Albany, a work for wh ich his training, interests and experience especially fitted him. He re he had opportunity to carry on researches in the several fiel ds of his interests, to write as a teacher sincerely concerned with the ideals and purposes of education, and to widen his contacts with scientific worker s. His accomplishments and usefulness grew steadily and this mak es more poignant his untimely passing.

      Dayton Stoner made an admirable contribution to knowledge.  He never lost an opportunity to gather useful facts.As an example of how he u til ized every occasion to harvest detailed data, one has but to recall his numerous and orderly records of animals killed on highways, a by-product of his travels.  No less than 14 titles in his complete bibliograp hy de al with the mortality of animals as observed on highways.

It is here fitting and proper to record, as did Dayton Stoner on numerous occasions, the full and able assistance he received from his wife, w ho survives him in Albany. She was companion, aid and co-worker in many of his enter­prises, and a zoologist in her own right.

It is difficult to summarize the characteristics of a man or evaluate his work. Rather sporadic contacts with Dayton Stoner reveal ed h im to me to be especially conscientious and conservative. Caution gua rd ed him against unestablished procedures. No one could have been more anxious to have statement strictly in accord with fact. His joy came from h is w ork which was voluminous and well done.  He possessed geniality although it was usually covered by formality and reserve. He followed the progress of his former students with special interest. Anyone who had contact with him as state zoologist, particularly inquiring correspondents, fo und h im always willing and helpful. He will be missed by many men although he had few intimates.

Stoner's published books, papers and notes run to 163 titles.  Fif te en of these dealt entirely or principally with mammals. An additional six papers are in press, two of which concern mammals.

More About DAYTON K. STONER:
Burial: 1944, North Liberty Cemetery, North Liberty, IA
Cause of death (Facts Pg): 08 May 1944, Heart failure


24.  CHRISTEN7 CHRISTENSEN (JOKUM6, CHRISTEN5 PEDERSON, PEDER4 ANDERSSON, ANDERS3 HALVARDSON, HALVARD2 ANDERSSON, ANDERS1 HANSSON) was born 28 May 1847 in Tjernagel, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway, and died 16 Apr 1917 in Milwaukee, WI.  He married ANNA EVENSON HOVE Jan 1871 in Milwaukee, WI.  She was born 05 Oct 1851 in Norway, and died 25 May 1925 in Milwaukee, WI.

Notes for CHRISTEN CHRISTENSEN:
Biography from "History of Milwaukee County", 1881

CAPT. CHRISTIAN CHRISTIANSON was born in Norway, May 28, 184 7. He ca me to this city with his parents about thirty years ago. His fath er sti ll lives here, and is engaged in the coal and wood trade. He commen ced h is career on the lakes before the mast, in 1861, and has followed t he occu pation since. He has held the office of captain for ten years, a nd is n ow the commander of the "ELIDA." He is
part owner of the "JENNIE BELL." He was married in January, 187 1, to Mi ss Annie Avenson, a native of Port Washington, Wis. They have fo ur childre n, Clarence, Jerome, Annetta Inora, and Olive Louisa.

More About CHRISTEN CHRISTENSEN:
Burial: 19 Apr 1917, Forest Home Cemetery, Milwaukee, WI
Christening: 06 Jun 1847
Emigration: 1852, Schooner "Rogaland" departed Stavanger April 21, 1852
Immigration: 1852, Schooner "Rogaland" arrived New York June 10, 1852.

Notes for ANNA EVENSON HOVE:
Vitals courtesy Mildrid Nickson.
   
Children of CHRISTEN CHRISTENSEN and ANNA HOVE are:
    i.    ANNETTA IONA8 CHRISTENSEN, b. 23 Aug 1872, Wisconsin; d. 24 Nov 1952, Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

Notes for ANNETTA IONA CHRISTENSEN:
Vtals courtesy of Mildrid Nickson.

More About ANNETTA IONA CHRISTENSEN:
Burial: 26 Nov 1952, Forest Home Cemetery, Milwaukee, WI

    ii.    CLARENCE CHRISTENSEN, b. 16 Sep 1873, Wisconsin; d. 14 Apr 1924, 4511 or 4711 Rogers St., West Allis, WI; m. HATTIE GAISER.

Notes for CLARENCE CHRISTENSEN:
Military Service:

Source:  Letter to Hayford Enwall from Dale J. Wiensch on State of Wisco ns in Department of Military Affairs letterhead.  Letter dated 16 June 198 2.

Dear Colonel Enwall:

Reference your letter of May 25 regarding a relative, Clarence Christen se n, Milwaukee.

Clarence Christensen enlisted at the age of 18 in Company H, 4th Infan tr y, Wisconsin National Guard on 29 December 1892. He was commissi on ed a 2d Lieutenant on 28 June 1893, and a 1st Lieutenant on 25 Septemb er 1 894.

1LT Christensen was discharged, Wis NG on 11 July 1898 when he volunte er ed for U. S. Service, Spanish American War.  He was mustered into ser vi ce 11 July 1898, and mustered out 28 February 1899 as a 1LT at Camp Sh ip p, Anniston, Alabama.

He was commissioned 1LT and Battalion Adjutant 23 June 1899, rank 25 Sep te mber 1894; and resigned 26 March 1901.

At the age of 42 he enlisted in the 15th Separate Company, Wisconsin S ta te Guard. He was commissioned a 1LT on 17 September 1917; detailed to t emp orary command, 42d Sep Co on 31 January 1918; commissioned Capta in 19 Febr uary 1918, 42 Sep Co, WSG; and assigned to Co H, 7th Inf W SG on 2 May 191 8. He was commissioned Major 13 May 1918, and was muster ed out 5 March 19 20 when the Wisconsin National Guard was reorganizing af ter World War I.

Major Christensen was commissioned in the Wisconsin National Guard Res er ve on 4 November 1919 with Federal recognition to date from 27 July 1 92 0. He resigned his commission when he was commissioned Major in the Wis con sin National Guard on 25 August 1920, Federal recognition 4 Septemb er 192 0. He was detailed to command all Infantry units WNG stationed at M ilwauk ee and West Allis. His last assignment was with 3d Bn, lst Inf, WNG .

Major Christensen transferred to Wisconsin National Guard Reser ve on 30 Ju ne 1923, and accepted an appointment as Major, Infantry, Offic er Reserve C orp on 8 July 1923.

Our records state that he was born on 25 September 1874. He gave his occ up ation as a clerk when he enlisted. He was 5'8" tall, blue eyes, lig ht ha ir and complexion. He died 14 April 1924. His last known address w as 45 11 Rogers Street, West Allis, WI.

Discharge records for Wisconsin veterans, Spanish American War, are on p er manent file at Wisconsin Department of Veterans Affairs, 77 North Dicki ns on Street, Madison, WI 53703. The Department also has a graves registra tio n.

Other details regarding his civilian occupation, parents and family c ou ld probably be found from census reports on file at the State Historic al S ociety, 816 State Street, Madison, WI 53706. See inclosure on Geneolo gic al Aids in the Library of the State Historical Society.

Sincerely,

DALE J. WIENSCH
COL, GS, WIARNG
Dir, Pers & Admin

More About CLARENCE CHRISTENSEN:
Occupation: 1924, Bookkeeper for Mount Pleasant Dairy Company

    iii.    JEROME CHRISTENSEN, b. 06 Nov 1877, Wisconsin; d. Jun 1969, Racine, WI.

Notes for JEROME CHRISTENSEN:
Vitals courtesy of Mildrid Nickson.

    iv.    OLIVE LOUISE CHRISTENSEN, b. 09 May 1881, Wisconsin; d. 03 Mar 1964, Wisconsin.

Notes for OLIVE LOUISE CHRISTENSEN:
Vitals courtesy of Mildrid Nickson

More About OLIVE LOUISE CHRISTENSEN:
Burial: 06 Mar 1964, Forest Home Cemetery, Milwaukee, WI


25.  ANNA OLIVE7 CHRISTENSEN (JOKUM6, CHRISTEN5 PEDERSON, PEDER4 ANDERSSON, ANDERS3 HALVARDSON, HALVARD2 ANDERSSON, ANDERS1 HANSSON) was born 11 Jun 1859 in Wisconsin, and died 04 Feb 1916.  She married JOHN B. MUNSON 18 Oct 1879.  He was born 11 Jan 1851, and died 07 Jun 1920.

Notes for JOHN B. MUNSON:
Vitals courtesy of Mildrid Nickson.
   
Children of ANNA CHRISTENSEN and JOHN MUNSON are:
    i.    BERTHA C.8 MUNSON, b. 31 Jan 1880.
    ii.    JOKUM J. MUNSON, b. 07 Mar 1881, Wisconsin.
    iii.    ANNIE M. MUNSON, b. 16 Jun 1883; d. 02 Aug 1883.
    iv.    ARTHUR MUNSON, b. 22 Oct 1884.
    v.    CHESTER MUNSON, b. 01 Nov 1886, Wisconsin.
    vi.    CARL MUNSON, b. 24 Dec 1888.
    vii.    JOHN B. MUNSON, b. 01 Dec 1890; d. 25 Mar 1925.


26.  THEODORE JOHAN7 CHRISTENSEN (JOKUM6, CHRISTEN5 PEDERSON, PEDER4 ANDERSSON, ANDERS3 HALVARDSON, HALVARD2 ANDERSSON, ANDERS1 HANSSON) was born 15 Feb 1866 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and died 18 Jul 1905 in Milwaukee, WI.  He married MATILDA OLIVA CIVERNA OLSON 06 Jun 1883 in Milwaukee, WI.  She was born 20 Aug 1861 in Christiana (Olso), Norway, and died 12 Aug 1945 in Whitehall, MI.

More About THEODORE JOHAN CHRISTENSEN:
Occupation: 1889, Bookkeeper

Notes for MATILDA OLIVA CIVERNA OLSON:
Vitals courtesy of Mildrid Nickson.
   
Children of THEODORE CHRISTENSEN and MATILDA OLSON are:
    i.    LILLIAN AMANDA8 CHRISTENSEN, b. 07 Oct 1883, Milwaukee, WI; d. 1958, Milwaukee, WI; m. JUDSON JAY BRONSON.

Notes for LILLIAN AMANDA CHRISTENSEN:
Vitals courtesy of Mildrid Nickson.

    ii.    CORRA JEANETTE CHRISTENSEN, b. 10 Mar 1886, Milwaukee, WI; d. 13 Jun 1886, Milwaukee, WI.

Notes for CORRA JEANETTE CHRISTENSEN:
Vitals couirtesy of Mildrid Nickson.

    iii.    OLIVER ALEXANDER CHRISTENSEN, b. 29 Mar 1887, Milwaukee, WI; d. 13 Mar 1970, Whitehall, MI; m. CARRIE BERNICE KOLINSKY; b. 13 Jun 1892, Milwaukee, WI; d. 06 Feb 1985, Muskegon, MI.

Notes for OLIVER ALEXANDER CHRISTENSEN:
Vitals courtesy of Mildrid Nickson.

Notes for CARRIE BERNICE KOLINSKY:
Vitals courtesy of Mildrid Nickson.

    iv.    THEODORE JOHN CHRISTENSEN, b. 29 Jan 1889, Milwaukee, WI; d. 31 Jan 1891, Milwaukee, WI.

Notes for THEODORE JOHN CHRISTENSEN:
Vitals courtesy of Mildrid Nickson.

    v.    CORRA MABEL CHRISTENSEN, b. 08 Aug 1890, Milwaukee, WI; d. 10 Oct 1974, Whitehall, MI; m. HERBERT T. LAUDEN; b. 22 Jun 1890; d. 16 May 1962, Isle of Palms, SC.

Notes for CORRA MABEL CHRISTENSEN:
Vitals courtesy of Mildrid Nickson.

Notes for HERBERT T. LAUDEN:
Vitals courtesy of Mildrid Nickson.

    vi.    ETHYL THERESE CHRISTENSEN, b. 07 Mar 1893, Milwaukee, WI; d. 17 Aug 1924, Milwaukee, WI.

Notes for ETHYL THERESE CHRISTENSEN:
Vitals courtesy of Mildrid Nickson.

    vii.    VOILET DOROTHY CHRISTENSEN, b. 21 Nov 1901, Milwaukee, WI; d. 11 Sep 1981, Whitehall, MI; m. FREDERICK ARTHUR KASSNER; b. 12 Nov 1898, Whitehall, MI; d. 01 Jan 1966, Muskegon, MI.

Notes for VOILET DOROTHY CHRISTENSEN:
Vitals courtesy of Mildrid Nickson.

Notes for FREDERICK ARTHUR KASSNER:
Vitals courtesy of Mildrid Nickson.


27.  BERTHA CHRISTINE7 LARSON (PEDER (STORE PER)6, HELGA5 PEDERSDATTER, PEDER4 ANDERSSON, ANDERS3 HALVARDSON, HALVARD2 ANDERSSON, ANDERS1 HANSSON) was born 29 May 1859 in Hamilton County, Iowa, and died 15 Nov 1932 in Story City, Iowa.  She married SAMUEL ESPE 08 Mar 1878.  He was born 25 Jan 1852 in Norway, and died 22 Jan 1920 in Scott Twp, Hamilton County, Iowa.

More About BERTHA CHRISTINE LARSON:
Burial: Mamrelund Cemetery, Iowa
   
Children of BERTHA LARSON and SAMUEL ESPE are:
    i.    PETER ESTES8 ESPE, b. 18 Dec 1878, Hamilton County, IA; d. 27 Apr 1879.
    ii.    MARTHA CAROLINE ESPE, b. 18 Jun 1880, Hamilton County, IA; d. 26 Sep 1881.
    iii.    CAROLINE ESPE, b. 16 Sep 1882, Hamilton County, IA; d. 22 Jan 1963, Mylo, ND; m. CARL J. ANFINSON, 11 Mar 1903.
    iv.    PETER ESPE, b. 18 Sep 1884, Hamilton County, IA; d. 30 Sep 1884, Hamilton County, IA.
    v.    PETER ESPE, b. 31 Jan 1886, Hamilton County, IA; d. Jun 1971, Ryderwood, Cowlitz County, WA; m. UNA FINNEGAN, 08 Mar 1924; b. 01 Nov 1902; d. 18 Jan 2000, Orting, Pierce county, WA.
    vi.    CLARA MALINDA ESPE, b. 20 Jul 1888, Hamilton County, IA; d. 01 Jan 1984, Missoula, Missoula County, MT; m. EDWARD J JOHNSON, 08 Oct 1905, Mylo, ND.
    vii.    BERTHA HELINE (HELEN) ESPE, b. 27 Jan 1891, Hamilton County, IA; d. 26 Nov 1956; m. CONRAD STEVENSON, 19 Sep 1909; b. 26 Dec 1889; d. Nov 1964, North Dakota.
    viii.    CHRISTINE ESPE, b. 25 Jun 1893, Hamilton County, IA; d. 30 Jun 1956, Story City, Story County, Iowa; m. ALFRED T. SANDE, 27 Jul 1918.
    ix.    AUSTIN ESPE, b. 30 May 1896, Story City, Story County, IA; d. 02 Jul 1964, Koochiching County, MN; m. LILLIE MAE MILLER, 23 Jun 1931, Bisbee, North Dakota; b. 15 Jul 1910; d. 16 Nov 1999, MN.
    x.    ALFRED ESPE, b. 02 Jun 1899, Scott Twp, Hamilton County, IA; d. 18 Mar 1934, Iowa City, Iowa.

More About ALFRED ESPE:
Cause of death (Facts Pg): 18 Mar 1935, Brain tumor


28.  PETER MARTIN7 PHILLOPS (CANUTE (KNUT PHILLIPS)6, KRISTI5 PEDERSDATTER, PEDER4 ANDERSSON, ANDERS3 HALVARDSON, HALVARD2 ANDERSSON, ANDERS1 HANSSON) was born 18 Jan 1869 in Scott Twp, Hamilton County, Iowa, and died 26 Mar 1936 in Story City, Story County, Iowa.  He married ANNA MARIA PETERSON 06 Feb 1890 in Story County, Iowa, daughter of ERICK PETERSON and JULIA JOHANNESSEN.  She was born 14 Jun 1871 in Iowa, and died 04 Feb 1940 in Webster City, Iowa.

Notes for PETER MARTIN PHILLOPS:
PETER MARTIN PHILLOPS OBITUARY - 1936
by Lewis J. Tjernagel
published in the Story City Herald, date unknown

Peter Martin Phillops was the only son of Knut and Malene Phillop s.  Kn ut Phillops, a veteran of the Civil War, came to this community imm ediate ly after the war and married Malene, who was the widowed wife of Pe ter Lar son Tjernagel.  Peter Larson and Malene had settled on the prair ie northea st of Story City in 1858, which afterwards became the large Phi llops farm.

P.M.Phillops was born Jan. 18, 1869.  He died in Story City March 26, 1 93 6.  He was born and reared in a Christian home, and the fruits of th at tra ining were plainly shown in the life and acts of the deceased.

He was united in marriage to Anna Marie Peterson, daughter of Eri ck J. a nd Chersti Peterson, pioneer folks of this community, Feb. 6, 189 0.  To th is union seven children were born, of whom two passed away whi le young.

He leaves to mourn his early demise his dutiful wife and the following c hi ldren:  Julia (Mrs. Jacob Vangess of West Concord, Minn.); Claren ce of Ken yon, Minn.; Mrs. Jennie Laneville of Webster City; Myrtle (Mr s. J.A. Hov e) of Stanhope, and Joseph of Des Moines.  He also leaves 14 g randchildr en and one great grandchild, and a host of other relatives a nd friends.

Martin Phillops can truthfully be called a pioneer's son.  He lived he re a ll his life and, in fact, farmed the original homestead until a few y ea rs ago, when he and his wife retired and moved to town.

After moving to town - as well as before - he had taken great inte re st in church work and in the Bethel congregation of which he was a mem be r.  He was always a man ready and willing to help in matters that we re f or the general good of the community, state and church.

Funeral services were conducted by his pastor, Rev. G. O. Paulsrud, Sun da y, March 29, in the St. Petri church.  Interment took place in the fa mi ly lot in Mamrelund cemetery.  Pall bearers were old time friends and n eig hbors:  Lars Omvig, Albert Jackson, Charley Johnson, Dedrick Munson, O smu nd Vangness and L. J. Tjernagel.

The writer of this will miss Martin Phillops very much, all all fe el th at a good friend has gone beyond.  Blessed be his memory.

- L.J.T.

More About PETER MARTIN PHILLOPS:
Burial: 29 Mar 1936, Mamrelund Cemetery, Story County, Iowa
   
Children of PETER PHILLOPS and ANNA PETERSON are:
    i.    JULIA MELINDA8 PHILLOPS, b. 27 Apr 1891, Scott Twp, Hamilton County, IA; d. 02 Feb 1965, West Concord, MN; m. JACOB (JAKE) OLAI VANGNESS, 12 Oct 1910, Iowa; b. 24 Dec 1888, Hamilton County, IA; d. 16 Jan 1985, MN.
    ii.    CLARENCE JOHN PHILLOPS, b. 06 Jan 1895, Scott Twp, Hamilton County, IA; d. 07 Jan 1982, Faribault, Minnesota; m. SARAH LOUISE HACHFELD, 02 Oct 1930, Faribault, MN; b. 14 Aug 1906, Faribault, Minnesota; d. 22 Jan 2002.

Notes for CLARENCE JOHN PHILLOPS:
Vitals courtesy of Brian Klier - Klier family tree at Ancestry.com.

More About CLARENCE JOHN PHILLOPS:
Burial: Meadow Ridge Cemetery, Rice County MN

Notes for SARAH LOUISE HACHFELD:
Vitals courtesy of Brian Klier - Klier family tree at Ancesty.com.

    iii.    JENNIE CHRISTINE PHILLOPS, b. 05 Nov 1896, Scott Twp, Hamilton County, IA; d. 11 Jun 1984, Dubuque, IA; m. (1) (DOC) LANEVILLE; m. (2) ROBERT ERNST, Abt. 1923, Iowa; b. 28 Aug 1895, Humboldt County, Iowa; d. Bef. 1930.

More About ROBERT ERNST:
Military service: Bet. 1917 - 1919, MP 88th Division, Company B.  Served in France 1918-1919.

    iv.    MYRTLE MARIE PHILLOPS, b. 20 Feb 1899, Scott Twp, Hamilton County, IA; d. 19 Jan 1968, Des Moines, IA; m. JULIAN ARTHUR HOVE, 26 Jun 1929; b. 1897, Stanhope, IA; d. 07 Nov 1948, Webster City, Hamilton County, IA.
    v.    HARVEY DAVIS PHILLOPS, b. 11 Feb 1902, Scott Twp, Hamilton County, IA; d. 14 Dec 1914, Scott Twp, Hamilton County, IA.
    vi.    JOSEPH ELROY PHILLOPS, b. 05 Mar 1907, Scott Twp, Hamilton County, IA; d. 14 Mar 1968, Des Moines, IA.
    vii.    MILDRED RUTH PHILLOPS, b. 25 Mar 1911, Scott Twp, Hamilton County, IA; d. 10 Oct 1919, Scott Twp, Hamilton County, IA.


29.  CHRISTIAN JOHAN7 CHRISTIANSON (ANDERS6, CHRISTEN5 PEDERSON, PEDER4 ANDERSSON, ANDERS3 HALVARDSON, HALVARD2 ANDERSSON, ANDERS1 HANSSON) was born 26 Oct 1855 in Illinois, and died 16 May 1911 in Randall, Iowa.  He married AAGETA (AGATHA) ANDERSON 14 Jul 1893, daughter of OLE ANDERSSON and BARBRU LARSDATTER.  She was born 21 Sep 1868 in Tjernagel Nordre Farm, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway, and died 1957.

More About CHRISTIAN JOHAN CHRISTIANSON:
Burial: Mamrelund Cemetery, Scott Twp, Hamilton County, IA
Census: 1900, Scott Township, Hamilton County, Iowa

More About AAGETA (AGATHA) ANDERSON:
Burial: 1957, Mamrelund Cemetery, Hamilton County, IA
   
Child of CHRISTIAN CHRISTIANSON and AAGETA ANDERSON is:
    i.    ANNA OVIDIA8 CHRISTIANSON, b. 04 Nov 1894, Iowa; d. 09 Feb 1920, Story City, Story County, Iowa.

More About ANNA OVIDIA CHRISTIANSON:
Burial: 1920, Mamrelund Cemetery, Hamilton County, IA


30.  MARY GERTRUDE7 LOGAN (CHRISTIAN CHRISTIANSON6, CHRISTEN5 PEDERSON, PEDER4 ANDERSSON, ANDERS3 HALVARDSON, HALVARD2 ANDERSSON, ANDERS1 HANSSON) was born Feb 1869 in Scott Twp, Hamilton County, IA.  She married HARTVICK SPARBOE. 
   
Child of MARY LOGAN and HARTVICK SPARBOE is:
    i.    OLE ANTON (ANTHONY)8 SPARBOE, b. Dec 1898.


31.  KNUTE (KNUT)7 LOGAN (CHRISTIAN CHRISTIANSON6, CHRISTEN5 PEDERSON, PEDER4 ANDERSSON, ANDERS3 HALVARDSON, HALVARD2 ANDERSSON, ANDERS1 HANSSON) was born 04 Oct 1870 in Scott Twp, Hamilton County, IA.  He married ISABELLE.  She was born Abt. 1870 in Iowa.
   
Child of KNUTE LOGAN and ISABELLE is:
    i.    CLIFFORD E.8 LOGAN, b. 05 Nov 1893, Iowa; d. 04 Jul 1988.


32.  HELEN BERDINE (DINA)7 LOGAN (CHRISTIAN CHRISTIANSON6, CHRISTEN5 PEDERSON, PEDER4 ANDERSSON, ANDERS3 HALVARDSON, HALVARD2 ANDERSSON, ANDERS1 HANSSON) was born 27 May 1873 in Scott Twp, Hamilton County, IA, and died 14 Jul 1958 in Mason City, Cerro Gordo County, IA.  She married JONAS CHRISTOPHER CHRISTIAN 18 Jun 1908.  He was born 20 Jan 1868 in Roland, Story County, IA, and died 21 Nov 1929 in Roland, Story County, IA.
   
Children of HELEN LOGAN and JONAS CHRISTIAN are:
    i.    UNNAMED8 CHRISTIAN, b. 07 Apr 1909, Howard Twp, Story County, IA; d. 07 Apr 1909, Howard Twp, Story County, IA.
    ii.    JOHN LOGAN CHRISTIAN, b. 17 Oct 1910, Howard Twp, Story County, IA; d. 10 Aug 1999, Story County, IA.
    iii.    JULIUS CECIL CHRISTIAN, b. 17 Oct 1910, Howard Twp, Story County, IA; d. 07 Nov 1998, Ames, Story County, IA.
    iv.    EARL BERLIN CHRISTIAN, b. 30 Dec 1913, Roland, Story County, IA; d. 19 Sep 1978, Ames, Story County, IA.


33.  MARY7 THORSEN (ELLEN KRISTINE6 CHRISTIANSON, CHRISTEN5 PEDERSON, PEDER4 ANDERSSON, ANDERS3 HALVARDSON, HALVARD2 ANDERSSON, ANDERS1 HANSSON) was born 25 Dec 1875 in Wisconsin, and died 17 Jan 1977 in Duluth, Saint Louis County, MN.  She married MARTIN C DUEA 13 Jul 1899 in Salem Lutheran Church, Roland, Story County, Iowa.  He was born Apr 1873 in Iowa, and died 21 Jul 1947 in Nicollet County, MN.
   
Children of MARY THORSEN and MARTIN DUEA are:
    i.    ARNOLD CLIFFORD8 DUEA, b. 30 Mar 1907, North Dakota; d. Aug 1965, MN.
    ii.    DAUGHTER DUEA, b. Abt. 1908, North Dakota.


34.  DOROTHY SEVERINE (HELENE)7 JOHANNESSEN (ANNA MARIE6 PHILLIPSDATTER, KRISTI5 PEDERSDATTER, PEDER4 ANDERSSON, ANDERS3 HALVARDSON, HALVARD2 ANDERSSON, ANDERS1 HANSSON) was born 10 May 1849 in Finnas, Hordaland, Norway, and died 01 Dec 1929.  She married IVOR A. OIEN.  He was born 24 Aug 1834 in Norway, and died 15 Jul 1904.

More About DOROTHY SEVERINE (HELENE) JOHANNESSEN:
Christening: 27 May 1849, Finnas, Hordaland, Norway
Emigration: 1850, Bergen, Norway on bark "Therese".
Immigration: 28 Aug 1850, New York on bark "Therese".
   
Children of DOROTHY JOHANNESSEN and IVOR OIEN are:
    i.    OSCAR FREDERICK8 OIEN, b. 28 Nov 1866; d. 30 May 1900.
    ii.    ANNA MARIA OIEN, b. 16 Oct 1868, Iowa; d. 08 Sep 1944, Spokane, WA; m. SJUR S. BERVEN; b. Abt. 1857, Norway; d. 26 Oct 1946, Tacoma, WA.
    iii.    CHARLES MICHAEL OIEN, b. 01 Jan 1870; d. 21 Jun 1934.
    iv.    HANNAH NICOLINE OIEN, b. 22 Apr 1873; d. 14 Oct 1875.
    v.    HANNAH ANDRINA OIEN, b. 08 Aug 1876; d. 02 Nov 1876.
    vi.    HANNAH OIEN, b. 08 Jul 1878; d. 11 Dec 1940.
    vii.    ALBERT IVAR OIEN, b. 13 Mar 1881.
    viii.    SEVERINE DORTHEA OIEN, b. 18 Nov 1883.
    ix.    SOPHIA FREDRICA OIEN, b. 08 Jul 1886; d. 26 Jan 1937.
    x.    CLARA OLIVE OIEN, b. 07 Apr 1891.


35.  JULIA CHERSTINE (KRISTI)7 JOHANNESSEN (ANNA MARIE6 PHILLIPSDATTER, KRISTI5 PEDERSDATTER, PEDER4 ANDERSSON, ANDERS3 HALVARDSON, HALVARD2 ANDERSSON, ANDERS1 HANSSON) was born 23 Dec 1850 in Wisconsin, and died 04 Apr 1920 in Story County, IA.  She married ERICK JOHANNES PETERSON 14 Jun 1866 in Story County, Iowa.  He was born 10 Jun 1835 in Skaanevik, Hordaland, Norway, and died 21 Jan 1925 in Story County, IA.

Notes for ERICK JOHANNES PETERSON:
Erick J. Peterson's Civil War Experience - by Nehemias Tjernagel

Erick J. Peterson returned to Illinois after his log-hewing for the St. Petri Church foundation near Story City, year 1862.  He was offered $18 per month as a farm hand, but being anxious to serve his adopted country in a time of need, decided to join the army.  He remained in the ranks three years receiving the then regulation wage of $13 a month.

He told us that during the war service he had the impression that he had gained the respect of his comrades, which as concerned his own person he ascribed largely to the good influence of early Christian training received from his parents back in the old Norwegian home in Skaanevig.  There the fear of God was general, the elders inculating in the growing generation the doctrine of Salvation as revealed in Holy Writ.

To illustrate how well it is to learn to restrain oneself and practice self-control, he told the following:  One day he and two other privates were teaming, and as the soil was sandy, the loads heavy, and the teams run-down, progress was slow and difficult.  One of the drivers had a long whip and volunteered to ply the lash on Peterson's team besides his own.  Somehow or other his aim seemed to go wrong and the punishment was laid on Peterson and not on his mules.  He felt this was done purposely, not miscalculated, but let him whang away as if unaware of it.  Arrived at the camp and being asked by some of the boys who had witnessed the by-play why he didn't wallop the hide off his tormentor, he answered that if it had been a lieutenant or a sergeant he would have invited him to a match, but that he never paid any attention to "trash".  The designation stuck, and the clever whip-handler became the laughing-stock of the regiment.

To avow Christianity and live up to it did not always afford the narrator smooth sailing, but it had its rewards, as the following will show:  One day as he entered the tent he found his mates deep in a game of cards - a money-winning game, presumably.  Card playing of this sort had become common in the camp and threatened to displace truly worthy interests.  This grieved Peterson and he asked those present to desist and seek uplifting pastimes and occupations.  Upon hearing this one of the players threw down his cards and said that if his action gave offence he was willing to quit.  This ended further card playing in that particular tent.  His concern for clean living became known in the camp and several spoke to him concerning the serious things of life.  One of the men confidingly expressed his opinion to him that he did not believe in Purgatory.  Peterson, being a Protestant upheld him in his opinion.  Another, a Negro soldier, sidled into Peterson's tent one day and said he had heard of him as being interested in the spiritual welfare of his comrades.  With this as an opening he asked our young new-comer friend to read for him from the New Testament in English, which he proved himself able to do fairly well, to the joy and gratitude of the colored man, who had been born here but could neither read nor write.  We hear of Erick being a worker in camps, and a soldier of the Cross, than a participant in the fray of the front.  All had their places from the mightiest corporal in the mess room down to the fighting private in the thick of the combat zone.  All remained prepared to obey orders, and to die for their cause if need be.
   
Children of JULIA JOHANNESSEN and ERICK PETERSON are:
    i.    ENGEL CAROLINE8 PETERSON, b. 06 Jul 1867, Iowa; d. 24 Nov 1951, Los Angeles, CA; m. JOHN NORDSKOG; b. May 1857, Norway.
    ii.    ANNA MARIA PETERSON, b. 14 Jun 1871, Iowa; d. 04 Feb 1940, Webster City, Iowa; m. PETER MARTIN PHILLOPS, 06 Feb 1890, Story County, Iowa; b. 18 Jan 1869, Scott Twp, Hamilton County, Iowa; d. 26 Mar 1936, Story City, Story County, Iowa.

Notes for PETER MARTIN PHILLOPS:
PETER MARTIN PHILLOPS OBITUARY - 1936
by Lewis J. Tjernagel
published in the Story City Herald, date unknown

Peter Martin Phillops was the only son of Knut and Malene Phillop s.  Kn ut Phillops, a veteran of the Civil War, came to this community imm ediate ly after the war and married Malene, who was the widowed wife of Pe ter Lar son Tjernagel.  Peter Larson and Malene had settled on the prair ie northea st of Story City in 1858, which afterwards became the large Phi llops farm.

P.M.Phillops was born Jan. 18, 1869.  He died in Story City March 26, 1 93 6.  He was born and reared in a Christian home, and the fruits of th at tra ining were plainly shown in the life and acts of the deceased.

He was united in marriage to Anna Marie Peterson, daughter of Eri ck J. a nd Chersti Peterson, pioneer folks of this community, Feb. 6, 189 0.  To th is union seven children were born, of whom two passed away whi le young.

He leaves to mourn his early demise his dutiful wife and the following c hi ldren:  Julia (Mrs. Jacob Vangess of West Concord, Minn.); Claren ce of Ken yon, Minn.; Mrs. Jennie Laneville of Webster City; Myrtle (Mr s. J.A. Hov e) of Stanhope, and Joseph of Des Moines.  He also leaves 14 g randchildr en and one great grandchild, and a host of other relatives a nd friends.

Martin Phillops can truthfully be called a pioneer's son.  He lived he re a ll his life and, in fact, farmed the original homestead until a few y ea rs ago, when he and his wife retired and moved to town.

After moving to town - as well as before - he had taken great inte re st in church work and in the Bethel congregation of which he was a mem be r.  He was always a man ready and willing to help in matters that we re f or the general good of the community, state and church.

Funeral services were conducted by his pastor, Rev. G. O. Paulsrud, Sun da y, March 29, in the St. Petri church.  Interment took place in the fa mi ly lot in Mamrelund cemetery.  Pall bearers were old time friends and n eig hbors:  Lars Omvig, Albert Jackson, Charley Johnson, Dedrick Munson, O smu nd Vangness and L. J. Tjernagel.

The writer of this will miss Martin Phillops very much, all all fe el th at a good friend has gone beyond.  Blessed be his memory.

- L.J.T.

More About PETER MARTIN PHILLOPS:
Burial: 29 Mar 1936, Mamrelund Cemetery, Story County, Iowa

    iii.    MICHAEL PHILLIP PETERSON, b. 27 Nov 1873; m. ANNA MATHRE.
    iv.    ERIC D. PETERSON, b. 28 Nov 1875.
    v.    JULIA C. PETERSON, b. 23 Jan 1878; m. GUY WICKS.
    vi.    JOHANNA PETRA PETERSON, b. 06 Apr 1880; m. SEVERT HOLLAND.
    vii.    PETER JOHAN PETERSON, b. 02 Dec 1882.
    viii.    SARAH ELIZABETH PETERSON, b. 02 Jul 1884; m. OSMUND HOLLAND.
    ix.    MARGRETHE (MARGARET) SEVERINA PETERSON, b. 04 Apr 1889, Iowa; d. Aug 1979, Los Angeles County, CA.
    x.    GERHARD RESOM PETERSON, b. 26 Jun 1891.


36.  CYRUS7 JACKSON (HELGA (HELEN PHILLOPS)6 PHILLIPSDATTER, KRISTI5 PEDERSDATTER, PEDER4 ANDERSSON, ANDERS3 HALVARDSON, HALVARD2 ANDERSSON, ANDERS1 HANSSON) was born 05 Dec 1858 in La Salle County, IL, and died 13 Sep 1947 in La Salle County, IL.  He married ISABELLA RASMUSSEN 07 Mar 1883 in La Salle County, IL.  She was born 08 Oct 1860, and died 09 Feb 1957.
   
Children of CYRUS JACKSON and ISABELLA RASMUSSEN are:
    i.    OREN SIDNEY8 JACKSON, b. 17 Dec 1883; d. 22 Aug 1959, La Salle County, IL; m. BELLA G TESDAL; b. 09 Feb 1889, Illinois; d. 20 Oct 1971.

More About OREN SIDNEY JACKSON:
Burial: Stavanger Cemetery, Miller Twp, LaSalle County, IL

More About BELLA G TESDAL:
Burial: Stavanger Cemetery, Miller Twp, LaSalle County, IL

    ii.    HERMAN A JACKSON, b. 04 Mar 1885; d. 27 Apr 1957; m. MILLIE C TORKELSON; b. 23 Feb 1889; d. 02 Apr 1974.

More About HERMAN A JACKSON:
Burial: Stavanger Cemetery, Miller Twp, LaSalle County, IL

    iii.    SIMON R JACKSON, b. 22 Sep 1886; d. 17 Apr 1972; m. LYDIA M LARSON; b. 02 Dec 1892; d. 12 Jul 1967.

More About SIMON R JACKSON:
Burial: Stavanger Cemetery, Miller Twp, LaSalle County, IL

More About LYDIA M LARSON:
Burial: Stavanger Cemetery, Miller Twp, LaSalle County, IL

    iv.    CLARA A JACKSON, b. Feb 1889.
    v.    LEON S JACKSON, b. 27 Jun 1894; d. 04 Jan 1980; m. RUTH T THORSON; b. 19 Apr 1900; d. 01 Dec 1987.

More About LEON S JACKSON:
Burial: Stavanger Cemetery, Miller Twp, LaSalle County, IL

More About RUTH T THORSON:
Burial: Stavanger Cemetery, Miller Twp, LaSalle County, IL

    vi.    VIOLET A JACKSON, b. 14 Feb 1897, La Salle County, IL; d. 10 Dec 1998; m. JOSEPH HALL; b. 09 Sep 1894, Grundy County, IL; d. Aug 1978, Seneca, LaSalle County, IL.
    vii.    MARION A JACKSON, b. 27 Jan 1900; d. 29 Jan 1992; m. RUTH RISK; b. 29 Nov 1901; d. 23 Nov 1965.

More About MARION A JACKSON:
Burial: Stavanger Cemetery, Miller Twp, LaSalle County, IL

More About RUTH RISK:
Burial: Stavanger Cemetery, Miller Twp, LaSalle County, IL


37.  FRANKLIN7 JACKSON (HELGA (HELEN PHILLOPS)6 PHILLIPSDATTER, KRISTI5 PEDERSDATTER, PEDER4 ANDERSSON, ANDERS3 HALVARDSON, HALVARD2 ANDERSSON, ANDERS1 HANSSON) was born 26 Dec 1861 in La Salle County, IL, and died 18 Mar 1947 in Shawnee, Oklahoma.  He married CELIA BELLE JOHNSON Mar 1883 in Stanhope, Hamilton County, IA.  She was born 10 Sep 1865 in Illinois, and died 19 Jan 1904 in Kingfisher, Oklahoma.
   
Children of FRANKLIN JACKSON and CELIA JOHNSON are:
    i.    ARTHUR8 JACKSON, b. 17 Feb 1884; d. 11 Sep 1962, Welch, Oklahoma.
    ii.    EFFIE BELVILLA JACKSON, b. 20 Apr 1886.
    iii.    HATTIE ODELLA JACKSON, b. 04 Nov 1889, Iowa.
    iv.    IRVING TRUMAN JACKSON, b. Sep 1890, Iowa.
    v.    ORVILLE JACKSON, b. 09 Sep 1892, Iowa.
    vi.    MYRTLE L JACKSON, b. 27 Nov 1895, Iowa.
    vii.    FLOYD FRANKLIN JACKSON, b. Abt. 1901, Oklahoma.
    viii.    BELOVIE BELLE JACKSON, b. Abt. 1904, Oklahoma.


38.  ALBERT7 JACKSON (HELGA (HELEN PHILLOPS)6 PHILLIPSDATTER, KRISTI5 PEDERSDATTER, PEDER4 ANDERSSON, ANDERS3 HALVARDSON, HALVARD2 ANDERSSON, ANDERS1 HANSSON) was born 26 Oct 1863 in La Salle County, IL.  He married ORA M OLSON 13 Mar 1893.  She was born Mar 1870 in Norway.
   
Children of ALBERT JACKSON and ORA OLSON are:
    i.    ORLANDO B8 JACKSON, b. 28 Dec 1893, Iowa.
    ii.    BAZIL JACKSON, b. 10 Feb 1895, Iowa.
    iii.    HELEN JACKSON, b. 20 May 1896, Iowa.
    iv.    ARNOLD FLOYD JACKSON, b. 27 Oct 1897, Iowa.
    v.    BERTLE JACKSON, b. 06 Apr 1899, Iowa.


39.  EMMA KRISTINE7 JACKSON (HELGA (HELEN PHILLOPS)6 PHILLIPSDATTER, KRISTI5 PEDERSDATTER, PEDER4 ANDERSSON, ANDERS3 HALVARDSON, HALVARD2 ANDERSSON, ANDERS1 HANSSON) was born 21 Feb 1866 in La Salle County, IL.  She married NELS R (WILLIAMSON) WILLIAMS 10 Oct 1888 in La Salle County, IL. 
   
Children of EMMA JACKSON and NELS WILLIAMS are:
    i.    ORVILLE HAROLD8 WILLIAMS, b. 30 Jun 1890.
    ii.    ROMO GASBY WILLIAMS, b. 21 Jul 1892.
    iii.    LEON WILBER WILLIAMS, b. 19 Sep 1894; d. Jun 1973, Vinita, Craig County, Oklahoma.
    iv.    HILA LUDILA WILLIAMS, b. 20 Dec 1896.


40.  ANNA JOSEPHINE7 JACKSON (HELGA (HELEN PHILLOPS)6 PHILLIPSDATTER, KRISTI5 PEDERSDATTER, PEDER4 ANDERSSON, ANDERS3 HALVARDSON, HALVARD2 ANDERSSON, ANDERS1 HANSSON) was born 26 Jul 1868 in La Salle County, IL.  She married JOHN S WILLIAMS 14 Mar 1888 in La Salle County, IL. 
   
Children of ANNA JACKSON and JOHN WILLIAMS are:
    i.    HOWARD O8 WILLIAMS, b. 27 Mar 1889; d. 17 Apr 1891.
    ii.    HAZEL OCTAVA WILLIAMS, b. 24 Jan 1892.
    iii.    SOLON WARNER WILLIAMS, b. 11 May 1894; d. Aug 1966, Iowa.
    iv.    LILLIARD MERLIN WILLIAMS, b. 09 Jun 1897.


41.  HELENE MARIA7 JACKSON (HELGA (HELEN PHILLOPS)6 PHILLIPSDATTER, KRISTI5 PEDERSDATTER, PEDER4 ANDERSSON, ANDERS3 HALVARDSON, HALVARD2 ANDERSSON, ANDERS1 HANSSON) was born 02 Jul 1871 in La Salle County, IL.  She married CHRIS WILLIAMS 14 Apr 1897 in La Salle County, IL. 
   
Child of HELENE JACKSON and CHRIS WILLIAMS is:
    i.    HERSCHEL OTTO8 WILLIAMS, b. 06 Jun 1898; d. Feb 1978, Story City, IA.


42.  LARS (LEWIS) JOHAN7 TJERNAGEL (OLE ANDREAS LARSON6, HELGA5 PEDERSDATTER, PEDER4 ANDERSSON, ANDERS3 HALVARDSON, HALVARD2 ANDERSSON, ANDERS1 HANSSON) was born 28 Jun 1862 in Norway, LaSalle County, Illinois, and died 11 Jun 1950 in Story City, Story County, Iowa.  He married SARAH JOHNSON 11 Jun 1885 in Story County, IA, daughter of JOHN JOHNSON and SOPHIA HETLETVEDT.  She was born Abt. 1861 in Mission Twp, LaSalle County, IL, and died 17 Jul 1914 in Story City, Iowa.
   
Children of LARS TJERNAGEL and SARAH JOHNSON are:
    i.    CLARENCE JEREMIAH8 TJERNAGEL, b. 19 Apr 1886, Scott Township, Hamilton County, IA; d. 27 Nov 1978; m. AGNES SNYDER, 30 Jun 1915; b. 12 Jun 1893, Stanhope, Iowa; d. 26 Apr 1986, Snohomish County, WA.
    ii.    MABEL EVELINE TJERNAGEL, b. 20 Jan 1888, Story City, Iowa; m. PAUL DORNACK, 19 Oct 1912, Rochester, MN.
    iii.    ALVINA TJERNAGEL, b. 07 Mar 1890; d. 22 May 1919; m. LOUIE C SHELDAHL, 11 Jun 1915, Huxley, IA.
    iv.    SARAH LUCILE TJERNAGEL, b. 01 Sep 1906, Story City, Iowa; d. 19 Mar 2001, Story City, Story County, Iowa.


43.  PEDER GUSTAV7 TJERNAGEL (OLE ANDREAS LARSON6, HELGA5 PEDERSDATTER, PEDER4 ANDERSSON, ANDERS3 HALVARDSON, HALVARD2 ANDERSSON, ANDERS1 HANSSON) was born 17 May 1865 in Follinglo Farm, Scott Township, Hamilton County, IA, and died 09 Apr 1932 in New Hampton, IA.  He married INGEBORG JOHANNA (JENNIE) OLSEN 31 Aug 1895.  She was born Aug 1872 in Iowa, and died 1960.

More About PEDER GUSTAV TJERNAGEL:
Occupation: Author of "The Follinglo Dog Book"
   
Children of PEDER TJERNAGEL and INGEBORG OLSEN are:
    i.    OTTO ALFRED8 TJERNAGEL, b. 07 Jul 1896, Scott Twp, Hamilton County, IA; d. 27 Sep 1958, Albert Lea, MN; m. AMANDA EVELINE HUSO, 28 Mar 1925, Lake Mills, Iowa; b. 02 Mar 1897, Joice, Worth County, Iowa; d. 13 Nov 1987, Lake Mills, Iowa.
    ii.    HERMAN ARNOLD TJERNAGEL, b. 16 Jan 1898, Scott Twp, Hamilton County, IA; d. 13 Mar 1987, Story City, Iowa.
    iii.    ELIZABETH TJERNAGEL, b. 28 Aug 1899, Scott Twp, Hamilton County, IA; d. 24 Jun 1976; m. CHRISTIAN OLSEN, 28 Aug 1929, Story City, IA; b. 10 Dec 1899, Nicollett, MN; d. 24 Apr 1978, St Peter, MN.
    iv.    ERLING MARTIN TJERNAGEL, b. 30 Oct 1900, Scott Twp, Hamilton County, IA; d. 01 Aug 1958.
    v.    ALFRED GUSTAV TJERNAGEL, b. 07 Dec 1902, Scott Twp, Hamilton County, IA; d. 30 Oct 1987, Story City, Iowa; m. HENRIETTA GLADYS ORIENE HANSON, 09 Jun 1940, Worth County, Iowa; b. 13 Feb 1910, Worth County, Iowa; d. 17 Sep 1994, Story City, Story County, Iowa.
    vi.    MARTHA KARINA TJERNAGEL, b. 13 Jul 1904, Scott Twp, Hamilton County, IA; d. 04 Oct 2000, Tacoma, WA; m. ADOLPH MARIUS HARSTAD, 12 Aug 1931, Story City, Story County, IA; b. 10 Jan 1902, Washington State; d. 16 Aug 1988, Tacoma, WA.

More About ADOLPH MARIUS HARSTAD:
Occupation: Pastor

    vii.    OLAF JOHAN TJERNAGEL, b. 24 Dec 1905, Scott Twp, Hamilton County, IA; d. 08 May 1970, Moorpark, Ventura County, CA; m. EVA KELLER, 28 Sep 1952.
    viii.    BERTHA MARGARETHE TJERNAGEL, b. 01 Apr 1907, Scott Twp, Hamilton County, IA; d. 06 Aug 1910, Scott Twp, Hamilton County, IA.
    ix.    PEDER JULIUS TJERNAGEL, b. 18 Apr 1909, Scott Twp, Hamilton County, IA; d. 09 Jun 1909, Scott Twp, Hamilton County, IA.
    x.    PEDER JULIUS TJERNAGEL, b. 10 Jun 1910, Scott Twp, Hamilton County, IA; d. 30 Jan 1969, Story City, Story County, Iowa; m. MARIE ANDRESON, 20 Sep 1947, Fisher, MN; b. 29 Nov 1917, Fisher, MN; d. 2002, Story City, Story County, Iowa.
    xi.    SIGURD LAURITZ TJERNAGEL, b. 12 Apr 1916, Scott Twp, Hamilton County, IA; d. 25 May 1986, New Ulm, MN; m. GERTRUDE ANDRESON, 01 Sep 1940; b. 17 Oct 1916, Fisher, MN; d. 16 Feb 2005, Mankato, MN.


44.  HELGE (HENRY) MATHIAS7 TJERNAGEL (OLE ANDREAS LARSON6, HELGA5 PEDERSDATTER, PEDER4 ANDERSSON, ANDERS3 HALVARDSON, HALVARD2 ANDERSSON, ANDERS1 HANSSON) was born 23 May 1871 in Follinglo Farm, Scott Township, Hamilton County, IA, and died 13 Feb 1940.  He married ANNA BRUE 27 Jun 1904 in Stanwood, WA.  She died 24 Nov 1924 in Lawler, Iowa.
   
Children of HELGE TJERNAGEL and ANNA BRUE are:
    i.    HELGA8 TJERNAGEL, m. ROLF JOACHIM SCHEY.
    ii.    OLAF ANDREAS TJERNAGEL, b. 07 Jun 1905, Stanwood, WA; d. 27 Jul 1907.
    iii.    NEELAK SARAWLOOK TJERNAGEL, b. 14 Dec 1906, Stanwood, WA; d. 07 May 1994; m. ADA YOUNG STUDHOLME, 1935; b. 20 Mar 1909, Smethport, NY; d. Oct 1986, Rochester, NY.
    iv.    OLIVIA TJERNAGEL, b. 08 Apr 1908, Stanwood, WA; d. 25 Jun 1986; m. TORALD NIKOLAI TEIGEN, 03 Oct 1939; b. Princeton, MN; d. 03 Sep 1970.
    v.    ROLF TJERNAGEL, b. 25 Mar 1910, Stanwood, WA; d. 30 Mar 1976.
    vi.    LARS JOHAN TJERNAGEL, b. 16 Mar 1914, Santa Barbara, CA; d. 15 Sep 1978; m. (1) AUGUSTA BERNHARD, 03 Dec 1934; b. 1917, Teller, Alaska; d. 08 Feb 1942; m. (2) ALVINA ESTHER JONES, 23 Jun 1946; b. 04 Apr 1926; d. 15 Sep 2000.
    vii.    STILLBORN SON TJERNAGEL, b. 16 Mar 1914, Santa Barbara, CA; d. 16 Mar 1914.
    viii.    ELNA TJERNAGEL, b. 12 Mar 1916, Santa Barbara, CA; d. 28 Feb 2004; m. BJARNE WOLLAN TEIGEN, 06 Sep 1937; b. 1909, Princeton, MN.
    ix.    OLAF ANDREAS TJERNAGEL, b. 20 Oct 1918, Gresham, WI; d. 21 Oct 1918.
    x.    BERTHA JORGINE TJERNAGEL, b. 24 Oct 1921, Gresham, WI.
    xi.    BORGHILD TJERNAGEL, b. 27 Apr 1923; d. 15 Dec 2004; m. JENS PETTER FJELD, 04 Jul 1970, Berkeley, CA.
    xii.    STILLBORN INFANT TJERNAGEL, b. 16 Nov 1924, Lawler, IA; d. 16 Nov 1924, Lawler, IA.


45.  MARTIN OLAI7 TJERNAGEL (OLE ANDREAS LARSON6, HELGA5 PEDERSDATTER, PEDER4 ANDERSSON, ANDERS3 HALVARDSON, HALVARD2 ANDERSSON, ANDERS1 HANSSON) was born 02 Jul 1877 in Follinglo Farm, Scott Township, Hamilton County, IA, and died 06 Nov 1959.  He married LOUISE M. LILLEGAARD 18 Feb 1919.  She was born 1886 in Bode, IA, and died 17 Jul 1957.
   
Children of MARTIN TJERNAGEL and LOUISE LILLEGAARD are:
    i.    MARGARETHE (MARGARET) LOUISE8 TJERNAGEL, m. INGVALD JAMES ANNEXSTAD; b. 1917, St Peter, MN; d. 21 Jan 2005.
    ii.    SARAH ANSOPH TJERNAGEL, m. (1) WILLIAM JOHN HASSOLD; m. (2) FREDERICK MARTIN SCHALOW, 07 Jun 1946; b. 1921, New York, NY; d. 1977.
    iii.    LAWRENCE BERNHARD TJERNAGEL, b. 18 Jan 1920, Story City, Story County, Iowa; d. 19 Jan 1920, Story City, Story County, Iowa.
    iv.    RUTH NAOMI TJERNAGEL, b. 11 Aug 1925, Story City, Story County, Iowa; d. 1986, Punta Gorda, FL; m. ARNOLD STROHSCHEIN.
    v.    ESTHER BERNICE TJERNAGEL, b. 11 Aug 1925, Story City, Story County, Iowa; d. 1995; m. KARL DONALD OLSEN, 19 Aug 1947; d. Abt. 2002.


46.  GUSTAV ADOLPH7 TJERNAGEL (OLE ANDREAS LARSON6, HELGA5 PEDERSDATTER, PEDER4 ANDERSSON, ANDERS3 HALVARDSON, HALVARD2 ANDERSSON, ANDERS1 HANSSON) was born 18 May 1884 in Follinglo Farm, Scott Township, Hamilton County, IA, and died 01 Oct 1954 in Pasadena, CA.  He married MARTHA DURBY 03 Aug 1921.  She died 05 Jan 1974.
   
Children of GUSTAV TJERNAGEL and MARTHA DURBY are:
    i.    PAUL GUSTAV8 TJERNAGEL, m. HELEN JANE SHERRARD.
    ii.    OLIVER ANDREAS TJERNAGEL, b. 05 Jan 1923, Iowa; d. 08 Jul 1996, Costa Mesa, Orange County, CA; m. MARVEL E LARSON; b. 05 Aug 1922, Story City, Iowa; d. Feb 1992, Costa Mesa, Orange County, CA.


47.  JOHAN ANDREAS7 ANDERSON (BARBRU6 LARSDATTER, HELGA5 PEDERSDATTER, PEDER4 ANDERSSON, ANDERS3 HALVARDSON, HALVARD2 ANDERSSON, ANDERS1 HANSSON) was born 10 Sep 1859 in Tjernagel Nordre Farm, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway, and died 1942 in Tjernagel Nordre Farm, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway.  He married (1) ELIANNE HALDORSDATTER 12 Jun 1883.  She was born 1862 in Tjernagel Nordre Farm, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway, and died 17 Jun 1885 in Tjernagel Nordre Farm, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway.  He married (2) TOMINE TOMASDATTER 06 Sep 1887.  She was born 1858 in Tjernagel Nordre Farm, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway, and died 1910 in Tjernagel Nordre Farm, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway.  He married (3) AASTA SJURSDATTER 11 May 1911.  She was born 1885 in Asbu, Norway, and died 1958 in Tjernagel Nordre Farm, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway.
   
Children of JOHAN ANDERSON and ELIANNE HALDORSDATTER are:
    i.    OVIDIA8 ANDERSON.
    ii.    ANNA CAROLINE ANDERSON, b. 19 Jun 1884, Tjernagel Nordre Farm, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway; d. USA; m. CARL STERNER, 04 Mar 1911.

   
Child of JOHAN ANDERSON and TOMINE TOMASDATTER is:
    iii.    OLAVA BERINE8 ANDERSON, b. 14 Jan 1888, Tjernagel Nordre Farm, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway; d. 04 Oct 1888, Tjernagel Nordre Farm, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway.

   
Child of JOHAN ANDERSON and AASTA SJURSDATTER is:
    iv.    OLE ANDREAS8 ANDERSON, b. 15 Apr 1918, Tjernagel Nordre Farm, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway; d. Abt. 1995.


48.  LARS ANDERSON7 TJERNAGEL (BARBRU6 LARSDATTER, HELGA5 PEDERSDATTER, PEDER4 ANDERSSON, ANDERS3 HALVARDSON, HALVARD2 ANDERSSON, ANDERS1 HANSSON) was born 12 Sep 1865 in Tjernagel Nordre Farm, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway, and died 05 Mar 1941 in Story County, Iowa.  He married ELISABET SERINE BUA 06 Jul 1896 in Bergen, Norway.  She was born 03 Mar 1876, and died in Iowa.
   
Children of LARS TJERNAGEL and ELISABET BUA are:
    i.    BARBRU8 TJERNAGEL, b. 22 Feb 1897, Tjernagel Nordre Farm, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway; d. 13 Jan 1970, New London, MN; m. LEONARD ANDERSON, 06 Nov 1918; b. 05 May 1881, Norway; d. 27 Oct 1945, Irving Twp, MN.
    ii.    OLE ANDREAS TJERNAGEL, b. 18 Jun 1898, Tjernagel Nordre Farm, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway; d. 19 Apr 1938, Story City, Iowa; m. GLADYS M JOHNSON, 31 Dec 1924; b. 09 Jun 1902, Randall, Iowa; d. Aug 2002, Story City, Iowa.
    iii.    HAKTOR JOHAN TJERNAGEL, b. 13 Apr 1900, Tjernagel Nordre Farm, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway; d. 23 Apr 1971, Story City, Iowa; m. ALVINA ORELLA JOHNSON, 31 Dec 1924; b. 02 Apr 1904, Randall, Iowa; d. 25 Jul 1997, Ames, Iowa.
    iv.    ELIZABETH TJERNAGEL, b. 20 Jan 1902, Hamilton County, IA; d. 30 Jan 1989, Ames, Iowa; m. OSCAR BRALAND, 17 Feb 1927; b. 04 Apr 1890, Hamilton County, IA; d. 01 Jan 1973, Story City, Iowa.
    v.    LOUISE SERINE TJERNAGEL, b. 05 Jul 1904, Hamilton County, IA; d. 04 Oct 1984, Ames, Iowa.
    vi.    HELEN MARIE TJERNAGEL, b. 30 Dec 1905, Hamilton County, IA; d. 05 Sep 1987, Story City, Iowa; m. OTIS BRALAND; b. 04 Nov 1896; d. 09 May 1986.
    vii.    ROSIE TJERNAGEL, b. 09 Dec 1907, Hamilton County, IA; d. 16 Nov 1995, Story City, Iowa; m. AMOS MELVIN BRALAND; b. 04 Aug 1905; d. 24 Jun 1978, Ames, Iowa.
    viii.    LARS L. TJERNAGEL, b. 18 Feb 1910, Scott Twp, Hamilton County, IA; d. 23 Feb 1993, Minneapolis, MN; m. EMMA MARIE ANDERSON, 31 May 1929, Story City, IA; b. 12 May 1908, Irving Twp, MN; d. 16 May 1977, Willmar, MN.
    ix.    CHRISTEN JOHAN TJERNAGEL, b. 13 Nov 1911, Hamilton County, IA; d. 31 May 1984, MN; m. VIOLETTE PAGGETT.
    x.    GUSTAVE CORNELIUS TJERNAGEL, b. 23 Nov 1913, Hamilton County, IA; d. 19 Feb 1941, MN.
    xi.    AGATHA GUNHILDA TJERNAGEL, b. 02 Dec 1914, Hamilton County, IA; d. 27 Jan 1993, Irving Twp, MN; m. CECIL ALVIN OLSON, 18 Jan 1934; b. 17 Aug 1911, MN; d. 04 Dec 1973, Willmar, MN.
    xii.    JOHAN ARNDT TJERNAGEL, b. 13 Feb 1917, Hamilton County, IA; d. 30 Apr 1976, Ames, Iowa.
    xiii.    ANNA OVIDIE TJERNAGEL, b. 04 Dec 1920, Hamilton County, IA; d. 15 Aug 1967, Des Moines, IA.
    xiv.    BENDICK ANDREW TJERNAGEL, b. 26 Mar 1923, Hamilton County, IA; d. 10 Nov 1997, MN; m. RUBY VIRGINIA AASEN.


49.  AAGETA (AGATHA)7 ANDERSON (BARBRU6 LARSDATTER, HELGA5 PEDERSDATTER, PEDER4 ANDERSSON, ANDERS3 HALVARDSON, HALVARD2 ANDERSSON, ANDERS1 HANSSON) was born 21 Sep 1868 in Tjernagel Nordre Farm, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway, and died 1957.  She married CHRISTIAN JOHAN CHRISTIANSON 14 Jul 1893, son of ANDERS CHRISTIANSON and HELEN LARSDATTER.  He was born 26 Oct 1855 in Illinois, and died 16 May 1911 in Randall, Iowa.

More About AAGETA (AGATHA) ANDERSON:
Burial: 1957, Mamrelund Cemetery, Hamilton County, IA

More About CHRISTIAN JOHAN CHRISTIANSON:
Burial: Mamrelund Cemetery, Scott Twp, Hamilton County, IA
Census: 1900, Scott Township, Hamilton County, Iowa
   
Child is listed above under (29) Christian Johan Christianson.

50.  PEDER OLAI ANDERSON7 TJERNAGEL (BARBRU6 LARSDATTER, HELGA5 PEDERSDATTER, PEDER4 ANDERSSON, ANDERS3 HALVARDSON, HALVARD2 ANDERSSON, ANDERS1 HANSSON) was born 10 Dec 1873 in Tjernagel Nordre Farm, Sveio, Hordaland, Norway, and died 12 Jan 1916 in Randall, Iowa.  He married HANNAH EMBERLAND 16 Sep 1893. 
   
Children of PEDER TJERNAGEL and HANNAH EMBERLAND are:
    i.    CHRISTIAN ADOLPHUS8 TJERNAGEL.
    ii.    OVIDIA BERTHINE TJERNAGEL, b. 15 Dec 1893, Iowa; m. ARTHUR ANDERSON, 02 Oct 1912.
    iii.    JOSEPHINE REGINA TJERNAGEL, b. 25 Jun 1895; m. (1) HENRY ENGVALD PETERSON; b. 29 Jun 1894; m. (2) HENRY ENGVALD PETERSON, 12 Jan 1918.
    iv.    GINA MARIE TJERNAGEL, b. 13 Feb 1897, Iowa; m. HARRY HOVE, 15 Mar 1918, Iowa; b. Iowa.
    v.    JULIA OLIVIA TJERNAGEL, b. 14 Apr 1899, Iowa; m. CLARION WELTHA, 26 Sep 1918; b. 04 Jun 1892, Randall, Iowa; d. May 1964.
    vi.    PEDER JOHAN TJERNAGEL, b. 23 Jul 1904, Iowa.
    vii.    SELMER OLIVER TJERNAGEL, b. 29 Nov 1909, Iowa; d. Mar 1960.
    viii.    BERTHA MARIA TJERNAGEL, b. 27 Dec 1911, Iowa; d. May 1991; m. (1) BURTON FJELLAND, Bef. 1934; b. 21 Aug 1903; d. Jan 1982; m. (2) BLOYD IVERSON, 06 Sep 1934.


51.  PETER LEWIS7 PETERSON (LARSINE6 LARSDATTER, HELGA5 PEDERSDATTER, PEDER4 ANDERSSON, ANDERS3 HALVARDSON, HALVARD2 ANDERSSON, ANDERS1 HANSSON) was born 19 Feb 1866, and died 06 Jan 1929.  He married (1) RENA JAMES 19 Dec 1890.  She died 16 Jul 1904.  He married (2) HANNAH WELLAND 01 Jan 1915. 
   
Children of PETER PETERSON and RENA JAMES are:
    i.    TRUMAN NEHEMIAS8 PETERSON, b. 30 Sep 1891; d. May 1971, Iowa.
    ii.    HENRY ENGVALD PETERSON, b. 29 Jun 1894; m. JOSEPHINE REGINA TJERNAGEL; b. 25 Jun 1895.
    iii.    LEWIS JOHAN (JOHN L) PETERSON, b. 29 Jan 1897.
    iv.    CARL RAYMOND PETERSON, b. 19 Aug 1899.
    v.    LOUISE THERESA PETERSON, b. 30 Mar 1902; m. WYLIE CAUDLE, 20 Mar 1924.


52.  THEODORA (DORA)7 PETERSON (LARSINE6 LARSDATTER, HELGA5 PEDERSDATTER, PEDER4 ANDERSSON, ANDERS3 HALVARDSON, HALVARD2 ANDERSSON, ANDERS1 HANSSON) was born 23 Oct 1870.  She married PETER OWENSON 06 Nov 1892.  He died 06 Dec 1932.
   
Children of THEODORA PETERSON and PETER OWENSON are:
    i.    MABEL LORENDA8 OWENSON, b. 08 Oct 1893; d. 15 Nov 1893.
    ii.    ORVILLE OWENSON, b. 17 Aug 1895, Randall, Iowa; d. Jun 1981, Randall, Iowa; m. MYRTLE JOHNSON, 12 Nov 1919.
    iii.    LILLY MATILDA OWENSON, b. 02 Oct 1896; m. OLE NOSTBAKKEN, 27 Jan 1927.
    iv.    CLIFTON OWENSON, b. 29 Jul 1899.
    v.    GRANT HOMER OWENSON, b. 24 May 1903; m. ALVINA THORESON, 30 Mar 1936.
    vi.    PEARL THELMA OWENSON, b. 07 Feb 1906; d. 07 Nov 1906.
    vii.    MILDRED IRENE OWENSON, b. 05 Aug 1916; d. 21 Oct 1916.


53.  NILS JOHANNES7 PETERSON (LARSINE6 LARSDATTER, HELGA5 PEDERSDATTER, PEDER4 ANDERSSON, ANDERS3 HALVARDSON, HALVARD2 ANDERSSON, ANDERS1 HANSSON) was born 29 Jan 1889.  He married ELSIE KNUTSON 20 Mar 1917. 
   
Children of NILS PETERSON and ELSIE KNUTSON are:
    i.    ELIZABETH LARSINE8 PETERSON, m. UNKNOWN FREMMING.
    ii.    MARGARET JULIA PETERSON.
    iii.    JOHN NORRIS (BUD) PETERSON, b. 03 Jul 1921; d. 11 Jun 1992.




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